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      Vividness of recollection is supported by eye movements in individuals with high, but not low trait autobiographical memory

      , , , ,

      Cognition

      Elsevier BV

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          Remembering the past to imagine the future: the prospective brain.

          A rapidly growing number of recent studies show that imagining the future depends on much of the same neural machinery that is needed for remembering the past. These findings have led to the concept of the prospective brain; an idea that a crucial function of the brain is to use stored information to imagine, simulate and predict possible future events. We suggest that processes such as memory can be productively re-conceptualized in light of this idea.
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            Aging and autobiographical memory: dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval.

            Cognitive aging research documents reduced access to contextually specific episodic details inolder adults, whereas access to semantic or other nonepisodic information is preserved or facilitated. The present study extended this finding to autobiographical memory by using a new measure; the Autobiographical Interview. Younger and older adults recalled events from 5 life periods. Protocols were scored according to a reliable system for categorizing episodic and nonepisodic information. Whereas younger adults were biased toward episodic details reflecting happenings, locations, perceptions, and thoughts, older adults favored semantic details not connected to a particular time and place. This pattern persisted after additional structured probing for contextual details. The Autobiographical Interview is a useful instrument for quantifying episodic and semantic contributions to personal remote memory.
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              Probing Interactions in Fixed and Multilevel Regression: Inferential and Graphical Techniques.

              Many important research hypotheses concern conditional relations in which the effect of one predictor varies with the value of another. Such relations are commonly evaluated as multiplicative interactions and can be tested in both fixed- and random-effects regression. Often, these interactive effects must be further probed to fully explicate the nature of the conditional relation. The most common method for probing interactions is to test simple slopes at specific levels of the predictors. A more general method is the Johnson-Neyman (J-N) technique. This technique is not widely used, however, because it is currently limited to categorical by continuous interactions in fixed-effects regression and has yet to be extended to the broader class of random-effects regression models. The goal of our article is to generalize the J-N technique to allow for tests of a variety of interactions that arise in both fixed- and random-effects regression. We review existing methods for probing interactions, explicate the analytic expressions needed to expand these tests to a wider set of conditions, and demonstrate the advantages of the J-N technique relative to simple slopes with three empirical examples.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Cognition
                Cognition
                Elsevier BV
                00100277
                January 2021
                January 2021
                : 206
                : 104487
                Article
                10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104487
                © 2021

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