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      Renal ischemic injury results in permanent damage to peritubular capillaries and influences long-term function.

      American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology

      Urine, Acute Kidney Injury, etiology, Animals, Blood Pressure, Capillaries, physiopathology, Dehydration, Diuresis, Fibrosis, Ischemia, Kidney, blood supply, pathology, Kidney Concentrating Ability, Kidney Tubules, Male, Natriuresis, Osmolar Concentration, Proteinuria, RNA, Messenger, analysis, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reperfusion Injury, Transforming Growth Factor beta, genetics, Transforming Growth Factor beta1

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          Abstract

          Acute episodes of severe renal ischemia result in acute renal failure (ARF). These episodes are followed by a characteristic recovery and repair response, whereby tubular morphology and renal function appear completely restored within approximately 1 mo. However, the chronic effects of such an injury have not been well studied. Male rats were subjected to 60-min bilateral ischemia followed by reperfusion, yielding a characteristic injury. Postischemic animals manifested severe diuresis, peaking at 1 wk postinjury (volume: >45 ml/day, ARF vs. 18 ml/day, sham; P < 0.05). Urine flow subsequently declined but remained significantly elevated vs. sham animals for a 40-wk period. The prolonged alteration in urinary concentrating ability was attributable, in part, to a diminished capacity to generate a hypertonic medullary interstitium. By week 16, proteinuria developed in the post-ARF group and progressed for the duration of the study. Histological examination revealed essentially normal tubular morphology at 4 and 8 wk postinjury but the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis at 40 wk. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 expression was elevated at 40 wk, but not at 4 and 8 wk postinjury. Microfil analysis revealed an approximately 30-50% reduction in peritubular capillary density in the inner stripe of the outer medulla at 4, 8, and 40 wk in post-ARF groups vs. sham animals. In addition, post-ARF rats manifested a significant pressor response to a low dose of ANG II (15 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1)). We hypothesize that severe ischemic injury results in a permanent alteration of renal capillary density, contributing to a urinary concentrating defect and the predisposition toward the development of renal fibrosis.

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          11592947

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