Blog
About

27
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      The ryanodine receptor store-sensing gate controls Ca2+ waves and Ca2+-triggered arrhythmias

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Spontaneous Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores is important for various physiological and pathological processes. In cardiac muscle cells, spontaneous store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) can result in Ca(2+) waves, a major cause of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) and sudden death. The molecular mechanism underlying SOICR has been a mystery for decades. Here we show that a point mutation, E4872A, in the helix bundle crossing region (the proposed gate) of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) completely abolishes luminal, but not cytosolic, Ca(2+) activation of RyR2. The introduction of metal-binding histidines at this site converts RyR2 into a luminal Ni(2+)-gated channel. Mouse hearts harboring a heterozygous RyR2 mutation at this site (E4872Q) are resistant to SOICR and are completely protected against Ca(2+)-triggered VTs. These data show that the RyR2 gate directly senses luminal (store) Ca(2+), explaining the regulation of RyR2 by luminal Ca(2+), the initiation of Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+)-triggered arrhythmias. This newly identified store-sensing gate structure is conserved in all RyR and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoforms.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 50

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Site-directed mutagenesis by overlap extension using the polymerase chain reaction

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Crystal structure and mechanism of a calcium-gated potassium channel.

            Ion channels exhibit two essential biophysical properties; that is, selective ion conduction, and the ability to gate-open in response to an appropriate stimulus. Two general categories of ion channel gating are defined by the initiating stimulus: ligand binding (neurotransmitter- or second-messenger-gated channels) or membrane voltage (voltage-gated channels). Here we present the structural basis of ligand gating in a K(+) channel that opens in response to intracellular Ca(2+). We have cloned, expressed, analysed electrical properties, and determined the crystal structure of a K(+) channel (MthK) from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum in the Ca(2+)-bound, opened state. Eight RCK domains (regulators of K(+) conductance) form a gating ring at the intracellular membrane surface. The gating ring uses the free energy of Ca(2+) binding in a simple manner to perform mechanical work to open the pore.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Relaxation of arterial smooth muscle by calcium sparks.

              Local increases in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) resulting from activation of the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle cause arterial dilation. Ryanodine-sensitive, spontaneous local increases in [Ca2+]i (Ca2+ sparks) from the SR were observed just under the surface membrane of single smooth muscle cells from myogenic cerebral arteries. Ryanodine and thapsigargin inhibited Ca2+ sparks and Ca(2+)-dependent potassium (KCa) currents, suggesting that Ca2+ sparks activate KCa channels. Furthermore, KCa channels activated by Ca2+ sparks appeared to hyperpolarize and dilate pressurized myogenic arteries because ryanodine and thapsigargin depolarized and constricted these arteries to an extent similar to that produced by blockers of KCa channels. Ca2+ sparks indirectly cause vasodilation through activation of KCa channels, but have little direct effect on spatially averaged [Ca2+]i, which regulates contraction.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Medicine
                Nat Med
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1078-8956
                1546-170X
                February 2014
                January 19 2014
                February 2014
                : 20
                : 2
                : 184-192
                Article
                10.1038/nm.3440
                24441828
                © 2014

                Comments

                Comment on this article