Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Minisatellite DNA mutation rate in dandelions increases with leaf-tissue concentrations of Cr, Fe, Mn, and Ni

      , ,

      Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Induced minisatellite germline mutations in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) living near steel mills.

          Despite widespread industrial release of genotoxic contaminants, little is understood of their role in inducing germline mutations in natural populations. We used multilocus DNA fingerprinting to quantify germline minisatellite mutations in families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) in three nesting categories: (a) near cities with large steel mills operating coking ovens; (b) near cities without steel mills; and (c) in rural locations removed from point sources of contamination. Gulls nesting near integrated steel mills showed significantly higher mutation rates than gulls from rural locations (Fisher's exact, P=0.0004); urban sites without steel mills fell midway between steel and rural sites (difference from rural; Fisher's exact, P=0.19). Distance of the nesting location of herring gulls from the steel industries' coking ovens was negatively correlated with minisatellite mutation rate demonstrating significant risk for induced germline mutations in cities with steel operations (Kendall Tau; tau=0.119; P<0.0001).
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Induction of minisatellite mutations in the mouse germline by low-dose chronic exposure to gamma-radiation and fission neutrons.

            Germline mutation induction at mouse minisatellite loci by paternal low-dose (0.125-1 Gy) exposure to chronic (1.66 x 10(-4) Gy min(-1)) low-linear energy transfer (low-LET) gamma-irradiation and high-LET fission neutrons (0.003 Gy min(-1)) was studied at pre-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Both types of radiation produced linear dose-response curves for mutation of the paternal allele. In contrast to previous results using higher doses, the pattern of induction of minisatellite mutation after chronic gamma-irradiation was similar to acute (0.5 Gy min(-1)) exposure to X-rays, indicating that the elevated mutation rate was independent of the ability of the cell to repair damage induced immediately or over a period of up to 100 h. Chronic exposure to fission neutrons was more effective than acute or chronic low-LET exposure (relative biological effectiveness, RBE=3.36). The data also provide strong support for the previous conclusion that increases in minisatellite mutation rate are not caused by radiation-induced DNA damage at minisatellite loci themselves, but rather from damage induced by ionising radiation elsewhere in the genome/cell.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Nickel(II) induces microsatellite mutations in human lung cancer cell lines.

              Nickel(II) is a human carcinogen causing respiratory cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Ni(II) may induce microsatellite mutations in human cells. We transfected the three human lung tumor cell lines A427, HCC15 and NCI-H2009 with a mammalian expression vector containing a (CA)(13) repeat in the coding sequences of the reporter hygromycin gene (hyg). A total of 33 clones carrying the integrated vector derived from the three cell lines was investigated for spontaneous and Ni(II)-induced hygromycin-resistant (hyg(r)) reversion mutants. Significantly higher frequencies of hyg(r) reversion mutations were observed in Ni(II)-treated cells (NCI-H2009 and HCC-15) than control cells. In the majority of the colonies hyg(r) phenotype was due to mutations within the integrated (CA) repeat sequence. The type of mutations consisted of both contraction and expansion of the (CA) repeat unit. The finding that Ni(II) promotes microsatellite mutations raises the possibility that genetic instability may be a mechanism involved in nickel carcinogenesis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                ETC
                Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
                Environ Toxicol Chem
                Wiley
                07307268
                15528618
                September 2003
                September 2003
                : 22
                : 9
                : 2093-2099
                10.1002/etc.5620220919
                © 2003

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article