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      Timing of seasonal migration in mule deer: effects of climate, plant phenology, and life-history characteristics

      , , , , , ,
      Ecosphere
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Decadal atmosphere-ocean variations in the Pacific

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            Ecological effects of climate fluctuations.

            Climate influences a variety of ecological processes. These effects operate through local weather parameters such as temperature, wind, rain, snow, and ocean currents, as well as interactions among these. In the temperate zone, local variations in weather are often coupled over large geographic areas through the transient behavior of atmospheric planetary-scale waves. These variations drive temporally and spatially averaged exchanges of heat, momentum, and water vapor that ultimately determine growth, recruitment, and migration patterns. Recently, there have been several studies of the impact of large-scale climatic forcing on ecological systems. We review how two of the best-known climate phenomena-the North Atlantic Oscillation and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation-affect ecological patterns and processes in both marine and terrestrial systems.
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              Human-induced changes in the hydrology of the western United States.

              Observations have shown that the hydrological cycle of the western United States changed significantly over the last half of the 20th century. We present a regional, multivariable climate change detection and attribution study, using a high-resolution hydrologic model forced by global climate models, focusing on the changes that have already affected this primarily arid region with a large and growing population. The results show that up to 60% of the climate-related trends of river flow, winter air temperature, and snow pack between 1950 and 1999 are human-induced. These results are robust to perturbation of study variates and methods. They portend, in conjunction with previous work, a coming crisis in water supply for the western United States.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ecosphere
                Ecosphere
                Wiley-Blackwell
                2150-8925
                April 2011
                April 2011
                : 2
                : 4
                : art47
                Article
                10.1890/ES10-00096.1
                8cce8cc8-a6e8-4706-9f08-952638bca0f6
                © 2011

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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