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      Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

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          Abstract

          Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD + metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP + and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

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          Most cited references 22

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          A new and sensitive method for measuring thermal nociception in cutaneous hyperalgesia.

          A method to measure cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimulation in unrestrained animals is described. The testing paradigm uses an automated detection of the behavioral end-point; repeated testing does not contribute to the development of the observed hyperalgesia. Carrageenan-induced inflammation resulted in significantly shorter paw withdrawal latencies as compared to saline-treated paws and these latency changes corresponded to a decreased thermal nociceptive threshold. Both the thermal method and the Randall-Selitto mechanical method detected dose-related hyperalgesia and its blockade by either morphine or indomethacin. However, the thermal method showed greater bioassay sensitivity and allowed for the measurement of other behavioral parameters in addition to the nociceptive threshold.
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            Regulation of clock and NPAS2 DNA binding by the redox state of NAD cofactors.

            Clock:BMAL1 and NPAS2:BMAL1 are heterodimeric transcription factors that control gene expression as a function of the light-dark cycle. Although built to fluctuate at or near a 24-hour cycle, the clock can be entrained by light, activity, or food. Here we show that the DNA-binding activity of the Clock:BMAL1 and NPAS2:BMAL1 heterodimers is regulated by the redox state of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactors in a purified system. The reduced forms of the redox cofactors, NAD(H) and NADP(H), strongly enhance DNA binding of the Clock:BMAL1 and NPAS2:BMAL1 heterodimers, whereas the oxidized forms inhibit. These observations raise the possibility that food, neuronal activity, or both may entrain the circadian clock by direct modulation of cellular redox state.
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              Diabetic neuropathy: mechanisms to management.

              Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscore the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group
                2045-2322
                27 May 2016
                2016
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Biochemistry, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa , Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
                [2 ]Iowa City Veterans Administration , Iowa City, IA 52246, USA
                [3 ]Department of Opthalmology, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa , Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
                [4 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa , Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
                Author notes
                Article
                srep26933
                10.1038/srep26933
                4882590
                27230286
                Copyright © 2016, Macmillan Publishers Limited

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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