11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      The G protein-coupled receptor repertoires of human and mouse

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Diverse members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily participate in a variety of physiological functions and are major targets of pharmaceutical drugs. Here we report that the repertoire of GPCRs for endogenous ligands consists of 367 receptors in humans and 392 in mice. Included here are 26 human and 83 mouse GPCRs not previously identified. A direct comparison of GPCRs in the two species reveals an unexpected level of orthology. The evolutionary preservation of these molecules argues against functional redundancy among highly related receptors. Phylogenetic analyses cluster 60% of GPCRs according to ligand preference, allowing prediction of ligand types for dozens of orphan receptors. Expression profiling of 100 GPCRs demonstrates that most are expressed in multiple tissues and that individual tissues express multiple GPCRs. Over 90% of GPCRs are expressed in the brain. Strikingly, however, the profiles of most GPCRs are unique, yielding thousands of tissue- and cell-specific receptor combinations for the modulation of physiological processes.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Basic Local Alignment Search Tool

           S Altschul (1990)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            TreeView: an application to display phylogenetic trees on personal computers.

             Roderic Page (1996)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Hidden Markov models in computational biology. Applications to protein modeling.

              Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are applied to the problems of statistical modeling, database searching and multiple sequence alignment of protein families and protein domains. These methods are demonstrated on the globin family, the protein kinase catalytic domain, and the EF-hand calcium binding motif. In each case the parameters of an HMM are estimated from a training set of unaligned sequences. After the HMM is built, it is used to obtain a multiple alignment of all the training sequences. It is also used to search the SWISS-PROT 22 database for other sequences that are members of the given protein family, or contain the given domain. The HMM produces multiple alignments of good quality that agree closely with the alignments produced by programs that incorporate three-dimensional structural information. When employed in discrimination tests (by examining how closely the sequences in a database fit the globin, kinase and EF-hand HMMs), the HMM is able to distinguish members of these families from non-members with a high degree of accuracy. Both the HMM and PROFILESEARCH (a technique used to search for relationships between a protein sequence and multiply aligned sequences) perform better in these tests than PROSITE (a dictionary of sites and patterns in proteins). The HMM appears to have a slight advantage over PROFILESEARCH in terms of lower rates of false negatives and false positives, even though the HMM is trained using only unaligned sequences, whereas PROFILESEARCH requires aligned training sequences. Our results suggest the presence of an EF-hand calcium binding motif in a highly conserved and evolutionary preserved putative intracellular region of 155 residues in the alpha-1 subunit of L-type calcium channels which play an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. This region has been suggested to contain the functional domains that are typical or essential for all L-type calcium channels regardless of whether they couple to ryanodine receptors, conduct ions or both.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                April 15 2003
                April 04 2003
                April 15 2003
                : 100
                : 8
                : 4903-4908
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.0230374100
                153653
                12679517
                © 2003
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article