6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Opposite turning behavior in right-handers and non-right-handers suggests a link between handedness and cerebral dopamine asymmetries.

      Behavioral Neuroscience

      Adult, Analysis of Variance, Dominance, Cerebral, physiology, Dopamine, metabolism, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Orientation, Reference Values, Sex Factors, Task Performance and Analysis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The strong right hand preference in humans remains a riddle; no lateralized behavior other than fine finger dexterity relates to it. The relation between handedness and language dominance may be far weaker than currently judged; after all, both right-handers and non-right-handers utilize the left brain for speech. There is, however, a lateralized motor preference in animals, turning behavior, that is strongly associated with hemispheric dopamine (DA) asymmetries. Turning consistently occurs towards the side with less DA. The authors tested 69 right-handers and 24 non-right-handers with a device recording spontaneous turning behavior for 20 hr within 3 days. Findings indicate that right-handers preferred left-sided turning and non-right-handers preferred right-sided turning. This result suggests a link between handedness and DA asymmetries. (c) 2003 APA

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          14674863
          10.1037/0735-7044.117.6.1448

          Comments

          Comment on this article