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      Exploitative leadership and organizational cynicism: the mediating role of emotional exhaustion

      Leadership & Organization Development Journal
      Emerald

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          The paper aims to clarify the relationship between exploitative leadership (EL) and organizational cynicism (OC). Besides, it aims also to examine the mediating role of emotional exhaustion (EE) underpinning this relation.

          Design/methodology/approach

          The data were collected by a questionnaire from 491 employees, who work in four telecom firms.

          Findings

          The paper provides empirical insights about how EL influenced OC; it suggested that EE fully mediated the positive relationship between EL and OC.

          Originality/value

          To the author’s knowledge, it is the first study to address the relationship between exploitative leadership and organizational cynicism. In addition, it is the first one to explore the mediating mechanism of emotional exhaustion underpinning this relation.

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          Most cited references78

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          Common method biases in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended remedies.

          Interest in the problem of method biases has a long history in the behavioral sciences. Despite this, a comprehensive summary of the potential sources of method biases and how to control for them does not exist. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results, identify potential sources of method biases, discuss the cognitive processes through which method biases influence responses to measures, evaluate the many different procedural and statistical techniques that can be used to control method biases, and provide recommendations for how to select appropriate procedural and statistical remedies for different types of research settings.
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            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Evaluating Structural Equation Models with Unobservable Variables and Measurement Error

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              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Sources of method bias in social science research and recommendations on how to control it.

              Despite the concern that has been expressed about potential method biases, and the pervasiveness of research settings with the potential to produce them, there is disagreement about whether they really are a problem for researchers in the behavioral sciences. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore the current state of knowledge about method biases. First, we explore the meaning of the terms "method" and "method bias" and then we examine whether method biases influence all measures equally. Next, we review the evidence of the effects that method biases have on individual measures and on the covariation between different constructs. Following this, we evaluate the procedural and statistical remedies that have been used to control method biases and provide recommendations for minimizing method bias.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Leadership & Organization Development Journal
                LODJ
                Emerald
                0143-7739
                November 10 2021
                January 27 2022
                November 10 2021
                January 27 2022
                : 43
                : 1
                : 25-38
                Article
                10.1108/LODJ-02-2021-0069
                8db6cc05-dc98-44e5-bdfc-2f40f87e72e8
                © 2022

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