7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      False Negative Tests for SARS-CoV-2 Infection — Challenges and Implications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references1

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in patients of novel coronavirus disease 2019

          Abstract Background The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is a newly emerging virus. The antibody response in infected patient remains largely unknown, and the clinical values of antibody testing have not been fully demonstrated. Methods A total of 173 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were enrolled. Their serial plasma samples (n=535) collected during the hospitalization were tested for total antibodies (Ab), IgM and IgG against SARS-CoV-2. The dynamics of antibodies with the disease progress was analyzed. Results Among 173 patients, the seroconversion rate for Ab, IgM and IgG was 93.1%, 82.7% and 64.7%, respectively. The reason for the negative antibody findings in 12 patients might due to the lack of blood samples at the later stage of illness. The median seroconversion time for Ab, IgM and then IgG were day-11, day-12 and day-14, separately. The presence of antibodies was <40% among patients within 1-week since onset, and rapidly increased to 100.0% (Ab), 94.3% (IgM) and 79.8% (IgG) since day-15 after onset. In contrast, RNA detectability decreased from 66.7% (58/87) in samples collected before day-7 to 45.5% (25/55) during day 15-39. Combining RNA and antibody detections significantly improved the sensitivity of pathogenic diagnosis for COVID-19 (p<0.001), even in early phase of 1-week since onset (p=0.007). Moreover, a higher titer of Ab was independently associated with a worse clinical classification (p=0.006). Conclusions The antibody detection offers vital clinical information during the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The findings provide strong empirical support for the routine application of serological testing in the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 patients.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            New England Journal of Medicine
            N Engl J Med
            Massachusetts Medical Society
            0028-4793
            1533-4406
            June 05 2020
            Affiliations
            [1 ]From the Center for Medicine in the Media, Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, NH (S.W.); the Lisa Schwartz Program for Truth in Medicine, Norwich, VT (S.W.); the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law (PORTAL), Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (S.W., A.K.); and Yale University, New Haven, CT (N.P.).
            Article
            10.1056/NEJMp2015897
            32502334
            8dcadde5-046c-49af-a505-08dc7bbd7365
            © 2020
            Product
            Self URI (article page): http://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMp2015897

            Comments

            Comment on this article