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      Canagliflozin: a novel treatment option for type 2 diabetes

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          Abstract

          Type 2 diabetes continues to be a challenging disease to manage. The addition of new agents with a positive risk–benefit ratio could potentially assist clinicians and patients in achieving adequate diabetes control. Canagliflozin, the first sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor presently available on the market, offers a unique mechanism of action: it inhibits renal reabsorption of glucose, thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. It reduces hemoglobin A 1c by approximately 0.37%–1.16%; it also reduces the patient’s weight and systolic blood pressure and has a low risk for hypoglycemia. Adverse effects include an increased risk of urinary tract infections and genital mycotic infections. In this manuscript we review canagliflozin and its potential role in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Efficacy and safety of canagliflozin in subjects with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

           J-F Yale,  G Bakris,  B Cariou (2013)
          Aims Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor in development for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin in subjects with T2DM and stage 3 chronic kidney disease [CKD; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥30 and <50 ml/min/1.73 m2]. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, subjects (N = 269) received canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg or placebo daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in HbA1c at week 26. Prespecified secondary endpoints were change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and proportion of subjects reaching HbA1c <7.0%. Safety was assessed based on adverse event (AE) reports; renal safety parameters (e.g. eGFR, blood urea nitrogen and albumin/creatinine ratio) were also evaluated. Results Both canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg reduced HbA1c from baseline compared with placebo at week 26 (–0.33, –0.44 and –0.03%; p < 0.05). Numerical reductions in FPG and higher proportions of subjects reaching HbA1c < 7.0% were observed with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus placebo (27.3, 32.6 and 17.2%). Overall AE rates were similar for canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg and placebo (78.9, 74.2 and 74.4%). Slightly higher rates of urinary tract infections and AEs related to osmotic diuresis and reduced intravascular volume were observed with canagliflozin 300 mg compared with other groups. Transient changes in renal function parameters that trended towards baseline over 26 weeks were observed with canagliflozin. Conclusion Canagliflozin improved glycaemic control and was generally well tolerated in subjects with T2DM and Stage 3 CKD.
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            Dose-Ranging Effects of Canagliflozin, a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor, as Add-On to Metformin in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

            OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, in type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, dose-ranging study in 451 subjects randomized to canagliflozin 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg once daily (QD) or 300 mg twice daily (BID), sitagliptin 100 mg QD, or placebo. Primary end point was change in A1C from baseline through week 12. Secondary end points included change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), body weight, and overnight urinary glucose-to-creatinine ratio. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. RESULTS Canagliflozin was associated with significant reductions in A1C from baseline (7.6–8.0%) to week 12: −0.79, −0.76, −0.70, −0.92, and −0.95% for canagliflozin 50, 100, 200, 300 mg QD and 300 mg BID, respectively, versus −0.22% for placebo (all P < 0.001) and −0.74% for sitagliptin. FPG was reduced by −16 to −27 mg/dL, and body weight was reduced by −2.3 to −3.4%, with significant increases in urinary glucose-to-creatinine ratio. Adverse events were transient, mild to moderate, and balanced across arms except for a non–dose-dependent increase in symptomatic genital infections with canagliflozin (3–8%) versus placebo and sitagliptin (2%). Urinary tract infections were reported without dose dependency in 3–9% of canagliflozin, 6% of placebo, and 2% of sitagliptin arms. Overall incidence of hypoglycemia was low. CONCLUSIONS Canagliflozin added onto metformin significantly improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and was associated with low incidence of hypoglycemia and significant weight loss. The safety/tolerability profile of canagliflozin was favorable except for increased frequency of genital infections in females.
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              SGLT2 inhibition--a novel strategy for diabetes treatment.

              Inhibiting sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLTs), which have a key role in the reabsorption of glucose in the kidney, has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes. Genetic mutations in the kidney-specific SGLT2 isoform that result in benign renal glycosuria, as well as preclinical and clinical studies with SGLT2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes, support the potential of this approach. These investigations indicate that elevating renal glucose excretion by suppressing SGLT2 can reduce plasma glucose levels, as well as decrease weight. Although data from ongoing Phase III trials of these agents are needed to more fully assess safety, results suggest that the beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition might be achieved without exerting significant side effects--an advantage over many current diabetes medications. This article discusses the role of SGLT2 in glucose homeostasis and the evidence available so far on the therapeutic potential of blocking these transporters in the treatment of diabetes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2013
                22 November 2013
                : 7
                : 1399-1408
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA
                [2 ]University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, Gainesville, FL, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Eric Dietrich, University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, 1707 North Main Street, Gainesville, FL 32609, USA, Email ead1129@ 123456ufl.edu
                Article
                dddt-7-1399
                10.2147/DDDT.S48937
                3840773
                © 2013 Dietrich et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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