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The Nature of the In Vivo Sodium and Chloride Uptake Mechanisms through the Epithelium of the Chilean Frog Calyptocephalella gayi (Dum. et Bibr., 1841) : Exchanges of hydrogen against sodium and of bicarbonate against chloride

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      Abstract

      The Chilean frog, Calyptocephallela gayi, placed in dilute NaCl solutions may pump Na + and Cl - at very different rates depending on the kind of bath solutions in which it was preadapted. Furthermore, Na + and Cl - may be absorbed from solutions in which the accompanying coion, such as sulfate and choline, respectively, is impermeant. In all these cases it is obligatory to postulate the existence of two ionic exchange mechanisms, Cl - and Na +, being exchanged against endogenous anions and cations, respectively. It has been determined that Na + is exchanged against endogenous H + and that Cl - is exchanged against HCO 3 -. In animals pumping Na + and Cl - from dilute NaCl solutions Na + or Cl - uptake may be selectively inhibited, while the flux of the accompanying ion remains unchanged. This is considered to be an additional proof that both Na + and Cl - fluxes are always independent. The role of the ionic exchange mechanisms in the direct regulation of the Na + and Cl - levels in the internal medium is discussed as well as their relationship in the regulation of the acid-base equilibrium; other physioecological considerations have been treated.

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      Affiliations
      From the Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Clasificador 198, Correo Central, Santiago, Chile
      Journal
      J Gen Physiol
      The Journal of General Physiology
      The Rockefeller University Press
      0022-1295
      1540-7748
      1 June 1969
      : 53
      : 6
      : 816-835
      2202876
      5822161
      Copyright © 1969 by The Rockefeller University Press
      Categories
      Article

      Anatomy & Physiology

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