Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Transcriptional profiling reveals evidence for signaling and oligodendroglial abnormalities in the temporal cortex from patients with major depressive disorder.

      Molecular Psychiatry

      Transcription, Genetic, physiopathology, Temporal Lobe, Taq Polymerase, genetics, Signal Transduction, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, physiology, Oligodendroglia, Myelin Sheath, Middle Aged, Male, Humans, Gene Expression Profiling, Female, Depressive Disorder, Major, Aged, Adult

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Major depressive disorder is one of the most common and devastating psychiatric disorders. To identify candidate mechanisms for major depressive disorder, we compared gene expression in the temporal cortex from 12 patients with major depressive disorder and 14 matched controls using Affymetrix HgU95A microarrays. Significant expression changes were revealed in families of genes involved in neurodevelopment, signal transduction and cell communication. Among these, the expression of 17 genes related to oligodendrocyte function was significantly (P < 0.05, fold change > 1.4) decreased in patients with major depressive disorder. Eight of these 17 genes encode structural components of myelin (CNP, MAG, MAL, MOG, MOBP, PMP22, PLLP, PLP1). Five other genes encode enzymes involved in the synthesis of myelin constituents (ASPA, UGT8), or are essential in regulation of myelin formation (ENPP2, EDG2, TF, KLK6). One gene, that is, SOX10, encodes a transcription factor regulating other myelination-related genes. OLIG2 is a transcription factor present exclusively in oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors. Another gene, ERBB3, is involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation. In addition to myelination-related genes, there were significant changes in multiple genes involved in axonal growth/synaptic function. These findings suggest that major depressive disorder may be associated with changes in cell communication and signal transduction mechanisms that contribute to abnormalities in oligodendroglia and synaptic function. Taken together with other studies, these findings indicate that major depressive disorder may share common oligodendroglial abnormalities with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 64

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Identifying differentially expressed genes using false discovery rate controlling procedures.

          DNA microarrays have recently been used for the purpose of monitoring expression levels of thousands of genes simultaneously and identifying those genes that are differentially expressed. The probability that a false identification (type I error) is committed can increase sharply when the number of tested genes gets large. Correlation between the test statistics attributed to gene co-regulation and dependency in the measurement errors of the gene expression levels further complicates the problem. In this paper we address this very large multiplicity problem by adopting the false discovery rate (FDR) controlling approach. In order to address the dependency problem, we present three resampling-based FDR controlling procedures, that account for the test statistics distribution, and compare their performance to that of the naïve application of the linear step-up procedure in Benjamini and Hochberg (1995). The procedures are studied using simulated microarray data, and their performance is examined relative to their ease of implementation. Comparative simulation analysis shows that all four FDR controlling procedures control the FDR at the desired level, and retain substantially more power then the family-wise error rate controlling procedures. In terms of power, using resampling of the marginal distribution of each test statistics substantially improves the performance over the naïve one. The highest power is achieved, at the expense of a more sophisticated algorithm, by the resampling-based procedures that resample the joint distribution of the test statistics and estimate the level of FDR control. An R program that adjusts p-values using FDR controlling procedures is freely available over the Internet at www.math.tau.ac.il/~ybenja.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Lifetime co-occurrence of DSM-III-R alcohol abuse and dependence with other psychiatric disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey.

            To study patterns of co-occurrence of lifetime DSM-III-R alcohol disorders in a household sample. Data came from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS), a nationally representative household survey. Diagnoses were based on a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Respondents with lifetime NCS/DSM-III-R alcohol abuse or dependence had a high probability of carrying at least 1 other lifetime NCS/DSM-III-R diagnosis. Retrospective reports have suggested that most lifetime co-occurring alcohol disorders begin at a later age than at least 1 other NCS/DSM-III-R disorder. Earlier disorders are generally stronger predictors of alcohol dependence than alcohol abuse and stronger among women than men. Lifetime co-occurrence is positively, but weakly, associated with the persistence of alcohol abuse among men and of alcohol dependence among both men and women. Caution is needed in interpreting the results due to the fact that diagnoses were made by nonclinicians and results are based on retrospective reports of the age at onset. Within the context of these limitations, though, these results show that alcohol abuse and dependence are often associated with other lifetime DSM-III-R disorders and suggest that, at least in recent cohorts, the alcohol use disorders are usually temporally secondary. Prospective data and data based on clinically confirmed diagnoses are needed to verify these findings.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Comorbidity of Mental Disorders With Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1038/sj.mp.4001565
                15303102

                Comments

                Comment on this article