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      Circulating and Dietary Trans Fatty Acids and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

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          Abstract

          OBJECTIVE

          To investigate the effects of trans fatty acids (TFAs) on type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) by specific TFA subtype or method of assessment.

          RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

          In the Cardiovascular Health Study, plasma phospholipid trans ( t)-16:1n9, t-18:1, and cis ( c) /t- , t/c- , and t/t-18:2 were measured in blood drawn from 2,919 adults aged 74 ± 5 years and free of prevalent DM in 1992. Dietary TFA was estimated among 4,207 adults free of prevalent DM when dietary questionnaires were initially administered in 1989 or 1996. Incident DM was defined through 2010 by medication use or blood glucose levels. Risks were assessed by Cox proportional hazards.

          RESULTS

          In biomarker analyses, 287 DM cases occurred during 30,825 person-years. Both t-16:1n9 (extreme quartile hazard ratio 1.59 [95% CI 1.04–2.42], P-trend = 0.04) and t-18:1 (1.91 [1.20–3.03], P-trend = 0.01) levels were associated with higher incident DM after adjustment for de novo lipogenesis fatty acids. In dietary analyses, 407 DM cases occurred during 50,105 person-years. Incident DM was positively associated with consumption of total TFAs (1.38 [1.03–1.86], P-trend = 0.02), t-18:1 (1.32 [1.00–1.76], P-trend = 0.04), and t-18:2 (1.41 [1.05–1.89], P-trend = 0.02). After further adjustment for other dietary habits, however, the associations of estimated dietary TFA with DM were attenuated, and only nonsignificant positive trends remained.

          CONCLUSIONS

          Among older adults, plasma phospholipid t-16:1n9 and t-18:1 levels were positively related to DM after adjustment for de novo lipogenesis fatty acids. Estimated dietary TFA was not significantly associated with DM. These findings highlight the need for further observational, interventional, and experimental studies of the effects TFA on DM.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Estimation of the concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in plasma, without use of the preparative ultracentrifuge.

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            Age-specific relevance of usual blood pressure to vascular mortality: a meta-analysis of individual data for one million adults in 61 prospective studies.

            The age-specific relevance of blood pressure to cause-specific mortality is best assessed by collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from the separate prospective studies. Information was obtained on each of one million adults with no previous vascular disease recorded at baseline in 61 prospective observational studies of blood pressure and mortality. During 12.7 million person-years at risk, there were about 56000 vascular deaths (12000 stroke, 34000 ischaemic heart disease [IHD], 10000 other vascular) and 66000 other deaths at ages 40-89 years. Meta-analyses, involving "time-dependent" correction for regression dilution, related mortality during each decade of age at death to the estimated usual blood pressure at the start of that decade. Within each decade of age at death, the proportional difference in the risk of vascular death associated with a given absolute difference in usual blood pressure is about the same down to at least 115 mm Hg usual systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 75 mm Hg usual diastolic blood pressure (DBP), below which there is little evidence. At ages 40-69 years, each difference of 20 mm Hg usual SBP (or, approximately equivalently, 10 mm Hg usual DBP) is associated with more than a twofold difference in the stroke death rate, and with twofold differences in the death rates from IHD and from other vascular causes. All of these proportional differences in vascular mortality are about half as extreme at ages 80-89 years as at ages 40-49 years, but the annual absolute differences in risk are greater in old age. The age-specific associations are similar for men and women, and for cerebral haemorrhage and cerebral ischaemia. For predicting vascular mortality from a single blood pressure measurement, the average of SBP and DBP is slightly more informative than either alone, and pulse pressure is much less informative. Throughout middle and old age, usual blood pressure is strongly and directly related to vascular (and overall) mortality, without any evidence of a threshold down to at least 115/75 mm Hg.
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              Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths.

              Age, sex, and blood pressure could modify the associations of total cholesterol (and its main two fractions, HDL and LDL cholesterol) with vascular mortality. This meta-analysis combined prospective studies of vascular mortality that recorded both blood pressure and total cholesterol at baseline, to determine the joint relevance of these two risk factors. Information was obtained from 61 prospective observational studies, mostly in western Europe or North America, consisting of almost 900,000 adults without previous disease and with baseline measurements of total cholesterol and blood pressure. During nearly 12 million person years at risk between the ages of 40 and 89 years, there were more than 55,000 vascular deaths (34,000 ischaemic heart disease [IHD], 12,000 stroke, 10,000 other). Information about HDL cholesterol was available for 150,000 participants, among whom there were 5000 vascular deaths (3000 IHD, 1000 stroke, 1000 other). Reported associations are with usual cholesterol levels (ie, corrected for the regression dilution bias). 1 mmol/L lower total cholesterol was associated with about a half (hazard ratio 0.44 [95% CI 0.42-0.48]), a third (0.66 [0.65-0.68]), and a sixth (0.83 [0.81-0.85]) lower IHD mortality in both sexes at ages 40-49, 50-69, and 70-89 years, respectively, throughout the main range of cholesterol in most developed countries, with no apparent threshold. The proportional risk reduction decreased with increasing blood pressure, since the absolute effects of cholesterol and blood pressure were approximately additive. Of various simple indices involving HDL cholesterol, the ratio total/HDL cholesterol was the strongest predictor of IHD mortality (40% more informative than non-HDL cholesterol and more than twice as informative as total cholesterol). Total cholesterol was weakly positively related to ischaemic and total stroke mortality in early middle age (40-59 years), but this finding could be largely or wholly accounted for by the association of cholesterol with blood pressure. Moreover, a positive relation was seen only in middle age and only in those with below-average blood pressure; at older ages (70-89 years) and, particularly, for those with systolic blood pressure over about 145 mm Hg, total cholesterol was negatively related to haemorrhagic and total stroke mortality. The results for other vascular mortality were intermediate between those for IHD and stroke. Total cholesterol was positively associated with IHD mortality in both middle and old age and at all blood pressure levels. The absence of an independent positive association of cholesterol with stroke mortality, especially at older ages or higher blood pressures, is unexplained, and invites further research. Nevertheless, there is conclusive evidence from randomised trials that statins substantially reduce not only coronary event rates but also total stroke rates in patients with a wide range of ages and blood pressures.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Diabetes Care
                Diabetes Care
                diacare
                dcare
                Diabetes Care
                Diabetes Care
                American Diabetes Association
                0149-5992
                1935-5548
                June 2015
                17 March 2015
                : 38
                : 6
                : 1099-1107
                Affiliations
                1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
                2Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, U.K.
                3Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
                4Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
                5Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
                6Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
                7Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
                8Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
                9Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
                10Division of Aging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
                11Boston Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Boston, MA
                12New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY
                13Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Qianyi Wang, qiw586@ 123456mail.harvard.edu .
                Article
                2101
                10.2337/dc14-2101
                4439533
                25784660
                © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
                Page count
                Pages: 9
                Product
                Categories
                Epidemiology/Health Services Research

                Endocrinology & Diabetes

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