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      Cinnamaldehyde disrupts biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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          Most cited references 31

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          Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils

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            Exploiting quorum sensing to confuse bacterial pathogens.

            Cell-cell communication, or quorum sensing, is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. Its use by bacterial pathogens to regulate genes that promote invasion, defense, and spread has been particularly well documented. With the ongoing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, there is a current need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. An antivirulence approach by which quorum sensing is impeded has caught on as a viable means to manipulate bacterial processes, especially pathogenic traits that are harmful to human and animal health and agricultural productivity. The identification and development of chemical compounds and enzymes that facilitate quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) by targeting signaling molecules, signal biogenesis, or signal detection are reviewed here. Overall, the evidence suggests that QSI therapy may be efficacious against some, but not necessarily all, bacterial pathogens, and several failures and ongoing concerns that may steer future studies in productive directions are discussed. Nevertheless, various QSI successes have rightfully perpetuated excitement surrounding new potential therapies, and this review highlights promising QSI leads in disrupting pathogenesis in both plants and animals.
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              Is Open Access

              Essential Oils in Food Preservation: Mode of Action, Synergies, and Interactions with Food Matrix Components

              Essential oils are aromatic and volatile liquids extracted from plants. The chemicals in essential oils are secondary metabolites, which play an important role in plant defense as they often possess antimicrobial properties. The interest in essential oils and their application in food preservation has been amplified in recent years by an increasingly negative consumer perception of synthetic preservatives. Furthermore, food-borne diseases are a growing public health problem worldwide, calling for more effective preservation strategies. The antibacterial properties of essential oils and their constituents have been documented extensively. Pioneering work has also elucidated the mode of action of a few essential oil constituents, but detailed knowledge about most of the compounds’ mode of action is still lacking. This knowledge is particularly important to predict their effect on different microorganisms, how they interact with food matrix components, and how they work in combination with other antimicrobial compounds. The main obstacle for using essential oil constituents as food preservatives is that they are most often not potent enough as single components, and they cause negative organoleptic effects when added in sufficient amounts to provide an antimicrobial effect. Exploiting synergies between several compounds has been suggested as a solution to this problem. However, little is known about which interactions lead to synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects. Such knowledge could contribute to design of new and more potent antimicrobial blends, and to understand the interplay between the constituents of crude essential oils. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge about the antibacterial properties and antibacterial mode of action of essential oils and their constituents, and to identify research avenues that can facilitate implementation of essential oils as natural preservatives in foods.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Microbiology
                Microbiology Society
                1350-0872
                1465-2080
                July 12 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ] 1​Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia
                [2 ] 2​Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore
                [3 ] 4​The ithree Institute, The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia
                [4 ] 3​The School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore
                [5 ] 5​School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
                Article
                10.1099/mic.0.000692
                © 2018

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