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      Umbilical Serum Copper Status and Neonatal Birth Outcomes: a Prospective Cohort Study.

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          Abstract

          Our study aimed to assess the distribution of copper (Cu) in umbilical cord serum and estimated the association between umbilical serum Cu status and neonatal birth outcomes in a Chinese population. Through the Ma'anShan Birth Cohort Study, 2689 maternal-singleton pairs with detailed birth records and available serum samples were identified. The tertile levels of ln-transformed Cu were used to define low, medium, and high levels for serum Cu. The median for umbilical cord serum Cu was 298.2 μg/L with a range of 123.1-699.6 μg/L in this study population. Our study found a positive association between the concentration of serum Cu in the umbilical cord and the duration of gestation. Compared with medium Cu levels, we found that infants with low Cu levels had a significant higher risk of preterm birth (OR = 5.06, 95% CI 2.74, 9.34) and early-term birth (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.10, 1.69) in the crude model. We also found that infants with high Cu levels had a significant higher risk of late- or post-term birth (OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.11, 1.95). A significant higher risk of preterm, early-term, and late- or post-term birth still remained, even after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings suggested that both Cu deficiency and Cu overload had an adverse effect on neonatal birth outcomes.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biol Trace Elem Res
          Biological trace element research
          Springer Science and Business Media LLC
          1559-0720
          0163-4984
          Jun 2018
          : 183
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China.
          [2 ] Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Hefei, Anhui, China.
          [3 ] Ma'anshan Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Center, Ma'anshan, China.
          [4 ] Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China. s.tong@qut.edu.au.
          [5 ] Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Hefei, Anhui, China. s.tong@qut.edu.au.
          [6 ] School of Public Health and Social Work and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. s.tong@qut.edu.au.
          [7 ] Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. s.tong@qut.edu.au.
          [8 ] Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China. taofangbiao@126.com.
          [9 ] Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics, Hefei, Anhui, China. taofangbiao@126.com.
          Article
          10.1007/s12011-017-1144-6
          10.1007/s12011-017-1144-6
          28856635
          8eb6c04c-a7b1-47e8-a670-357dc9599fb9

          Birth outcomes,Copper,Serum,Umbilical cord blood
          Birth outcomes, Copper, Serum, Umbilical cord blood

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