Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: not found

Alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for pest control: case studies in agriculture and forestry

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Neonicotinoid insecticides are widely used for control of insect pests around the world and are especially pervasive in agricultural pest management. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the broad-scale and prophylactic uses of neonicotinoids pose serious risks of harm to beneficial organisms and their ecological function. This provides the impetus for exploring alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for controlling insect pests. We draw from examples of alternative pest control options in Italian maize production and Canadian forestry to illustrate the principles of applying alternatives to neonicotinoids under an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. An IPM approach considers all relevant and available information to make informed management decisions, providing pest control options based on actual need. We explore the benefits and challenges of several options for management of three insect pests in maize crops and an invasive insect pest in forests, including diversifying crop rotations, altering the timing of planting, tillage and irrigation, using less sensitive crops in infested areas, applying biological control agents, and turning to alternative reduced risk insecticides. Continued research into alternatives is warranted, but equally pressing is the need for information transfer and training for farmers and pest managers and the need for policies and regulations to encourage the adoption of IPM strategies and their alternative pest control options.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 183

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A common pesticide decreases foraging success and survival in honey bees.

      Nonlethal exposure of honey bees to thiamethoxam (neonicotinoid systemic pesticide) causes high mortality due to homing failure at levels that could put a colony at risk of collapse. Simulated exposure events on free-ranging foragers labeled with a radio-frequency identification tag suggest that homing is impaired by thiamethoxam intoxication. These experiments offer new insights into the consequences of common neonicotinoid pesticides used worldwide.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces bumble bee colony growth and queen production.

        Growing evidence for declines in bee populations has caused great concern because of the valuable ecosystem services they provide. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been implicated in these declines because they occur at trace levels in the nectar and pollen of crop plants. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus terrestris in the laboratory to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, then allowed them to develop naturally under field conditions. Treated colonies had a significantly reduced growth rate and suffered an 85% reduction in production of new queens compared with control colonies. Given the scale of use of neonicotinoids, we suggest that they may be having a considerable negative impact on wild bumble bee populations across the developed world.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Overview of the status and global strategy for neonicotinoids.

          In recent years, neonicotinoid insecticides have been the fastest growing class of insecticides in modern crop protection, with widespread use against a broad spectrum of sucking and certain chewing pests. As potent agonists, they act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), their molecular target site. The discovery of neonicotinoids can be considered as a milestone in insecticide research and greatly facilitates the understanding of functional properties of the insect nAChRs. In this context, the crystal structure of the acetylcholine-binding proteins provides the theoretical foundation for designing homology models of the corresponding receptor ligand binding domains within the nAChRs, a useful basis for virtual screening of chemical libraries and rational design of novel insecticides acting on these practically relevant channels. Because of the relatively low risk for nontarget organisms and the environment, the high target specificity of neonicotinoid insecticides, and their versatility in application methods, this important class has to be maintained globally for integrated pest management strategies and insect resistance management programs. Innovative concepts for life-cycle management, jointly with the introduction of generic products, have made neonicotinoids the most important chemical class for the insecticide market.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [ ]Veneto Agricoltura, Legnaro, PD Italy
            [ ]Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste Marie, ON P6A 2E5 Canada
            Author notes

            Responsible editor: Philippe Garrigues

            Contributors
            049-8293899 , lorenzo.furlan@venetoagricoltura.org
            Journal
            Environ Sci Pollut Res Int
            Environ Sci Pollut Res Int
            Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
            Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Berlin/Heidelberg )
            0944-1344
            1614-7499
            3 October 2014
            3 October 2014
            2015
            : 22
            : 135-147
            25273517
            4284368
            3628
            10.1007/s11356-014-3628-7
            © The Author(s) 2014

            Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

            Categories
            Worldwide Integrated Assessment of the Impact of Systemic Pesticides on Biodiversity and Ecosystems
            Custom metadata
            © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

            Comments

            Comment on this article