3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      In vivo interference of pea aphid endosymbiont Buchnera groEL gene by synthetic peptide nucleic acids

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The unculturable nature of intracellular obligate symbionts presents a significant challenge for elucidating gene functionality, necessitating the development of gene manipulation techniques. One of the best-studied obligate symbioses is that between aphids and the bacterial endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola. Given the extensive genome reduction observed in  Buchnera, the remaining genes are crucial for understanding the host-symbiont relationship, but a lack of tools for manipulating gene function in the endosymbiont has significantly impeded the exploration of the molecular mechanisms underlying this mutualism. In this study, we introduced a novel gene manipulation technique employing synthetic single-stranded peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). We targeted the critical Buchnera groEL using specially designed antisense PNAs conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Within 24 h of PNA administration via microinjection, we observed a significant reduction in groEL expression and Buchnera cell count. Notably, the interference of groEL led to profound morphological malformations in Buchnera, indicative of impaired cellular integrity. The gene knockdown technique developed in this study, involving the microinjection of CPP-conjugated antisense PNAs, provides a potent approach for in vivo gene manipulation of unculturable intracellular symbionts, offering valuable insights into their biology and interactions with hosts.

          Related collections

          Most cited references41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          NIH Image to ImageJ: 25 years of image analysis

          For the past twenty five years the NIH family of imaging software, NIH Image and ImageJ have been pioneers as open tools for scientific image analysis. We discuss the origins, challenges and solutions of these two programs, and how their history can serve to advise and inform other software projects.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Mechanisms of Cellular Uptake of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

            Recently, much attention has been given to the problem of drug delivery through the cell-membrane in order to treat and manage several diseases. The discovery of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) represents a major breakthrough for the transport of large-cargo molecules that may be useful in clinical applications. CPPs are rich in basic amino acids such as arginine and lysine and are able to translocate over membranes and gain access to the cell interior. They can deliver large-cargo molecules, such as oligonucleotides, into cells. Endocytosis and direct penetration have been suggested as the two major uptake mechanisms, a subject still under debate. Unresolved questions include the detailed molecular uptake mechanism(s), reasons for cell toxicity, and the delivery efficiency of CPPs for different cargoes. Here, we give a review focused on uptake mechanisms used by CPPs for membrane translocation and certain experimental factors that affect the mechanism(s).
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Antimicrobial peptides keep insect endosymbionts under control.

              Vertically transmitted endosymbionts persist for millions of years in invertebrates and play an important role in animal evolution. However, the functional basis underlying the maintenance of these long-term resident bacteria is unknown. We report that the weevil coleoptericin-A (ColA) antimicrobial peptide selectively targets endosymbionts within the bacteriocytes and regulates their growth through the inhibition of cell division. Silencing the colA gene with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in size of the giant filamentous endosymbionts, which escaped from the bacteriocytes and spread into insect tissues. Although this family of peptides is commonly linked with microbe clearance, this work shows that endosymbiosis benefits from ColA, suggesting that long-term host-symbiont coevolution might have shaped immune effectors for symbiont maintenance.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                shige@nibb.ac.jp
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                5 March 2024
                5 March 2024
                2024
                : 14
                : 5378
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Basic Biology, School of Life Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), ( https://ror.org/0516ah480) 38 Nishigonaka, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 Japan
                [2 ]Laboratory of Evolutionary Genomics, National Institute for Basic Biology, ( https://ror.org/05q8wtt20) 38 Nishigonaka Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 Japan
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8350-4719
                http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4640-2323
                Article
                55179
                10.1038/s41598-024-55179-2
                10912616
                38438424
                8f2fdfe7-f418-4ee6-b3ad-9536e1a904ff
                © The Author(s) 2024

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 13 October 2023
                : 21 February 2024
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001700, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology;
                Award ID: Scholarship
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001691, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science;
                Award ID: JP20H00478
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Nature Limited 2024

                Uncategorized
                bacterial techniques and applications,symbiosis,coevolution
                Uncategorized
                bacterial techniques and applications, symbiosis, coevolution

                Comments

                Comment on this article