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      The moving rubber hand illusion revisited: comparing movements and visuotactile stimulation to induce illusory ownership.

      Consciousness and Cognition

      Adolescent, Adult, Female, Hand, physiology, Humans, Illusions, Male, Motor Activity, Physical Stimulation, Proprioception, Touch Perception, Young Adult

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          Abstract

          The rubber hand illusion is a perceptual illusion in which a model hand is experienced as part of one's own body. In the present study we directly compared the classical illusion, based on visuotactile stimulation, with a rubber hand illusion based on active and passive movements. We examined the question of which combinations of sensory and motor cues are the most potent in inducing the illusion by subjective ratings and an objective measure (proprioceptive drift). In particular, we were interested in whether the combination of afferent and efferent signals in active movements results in the same illusion as in the purely passive modes. Our results show that the illusion is equally strong in all three cases. This demonstrates that different combinations of sensory input can lead to a very similar phenomenological experience and indicates that the illusion can be induced by any combination of multisensory information. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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          Journal
          24705182
          10.1016/j.concog.2014.02.003

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