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      LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENTS OF WHITE FLAT AND RED OR WHITE PITCHED ROOFS FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ISRAEL

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          Abstract

          Historically, white flat roofs have been used in Israel due to the intense solar radiation and long, hot, rainless summers. However, red pitched roofs have also been frequently used for aesthetic reasons. It has been recently observed that red pitched roofs have been recolored white by homeowners. The goal of this study was to compare the life cycle assessments (LCAs) of white flat roofs versus red or white pitched roofs through their production (P), operational energy (OE), and maintenance to disposal (MtoD) stages. EnergyPlus software was used to evaluate the OE stage. The ReCiPe method was used to evaluate the environmental damages in all the stages. A two-stage nested ANOVA was used to determine the significant differences between the ReCiPe result of a white flat roof and the ReCiPe result of a red/white pitched roof. It was found that (i) selection of the best roof technology (flat or pitched) requires consideration of the LCA, including the P, OE, and MtoD stages; (ii) the white (flat and pitched) roof was the best technology, while the red pitched roof was the worst technology; and (iii) the combination of the ReCiPe endpoint hierarchical six methodological options method with two-stage nested hierarchical mixed ANOVA is the best approach for assessing the differences related to the LCAs of roof technologies.

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          Most cited references 58

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          Final Collapse of the Neyman-Pearson Decision Theoretic Framework and Rise of the neoFisherian

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            Effects of white roofs on urban temperature in a global climate model

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              Comparative life cycle assessment of standard and green roofs.

              Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the benefits, primarily from reduced energy consumption, resulting from the addition of a green roof to an eight story residential building in Madrid. Building energy use is simulated and a bottom-up LCA is conducted assuming a 50 year building life. The key property of a green roof is its low solar absorptance, which causes lower surface temperature, thereby reducing the heat flux through the roof. Savings in annual energy use are just over 1%, but summer cooling load is reduced by over 6% and reductions in peak hour cooling load in the upper floors reach 25%. By replacing the common flat roof with a green roof, environmental impacts are reduced by between 1.0 and 5.3%. Similar reductions might be achieved by using a white roof with additional insulation for winter, but more substantial reductions are achieved if common use of green roofs leads to reductions in the urban heat island.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Spring 2017
                : 12
                : 2
                : 95-111
                Author notes

                1. Department of Civil Engineering, Ariel University, P.O.B. 3, Ariel, 40700, Israel, svetlanap@ 123456ariel.ac.il

                2. Department of Civil Engineering, Ariel University, P.O.B. 3, Ariel, 40700, Israel, olegv@ 123456ariel.ac.il

                Article
                jgb.12.2.95
                10.3992/1943-4618.12.2.95
                © 2017 College Publishing
                Page count
                Pages: 17
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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