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      A new species of Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) from Northeastern China

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          Abstract

          Abstract

          This study describes and illustrates Chrysosplenium macrospermum Y.I.Kim & Y.D.Kim, a new plant species from Changbaishan Mt. (Baekdusan Mt.) in northeastern China. The species is most similar to Chrysosplenium valdepilosum in the series Pilosa but is readily distinguishable by short arching sterile branches, multiple (up to 3) flowering stems, and smooth surfaced seeds (without tubercles), which are ca. 30–50% larger than those of other members in the series.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Phylogenetic relationships and evolution in Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) based on matK sequence data.

          Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) consists of 57 species widely distributed in temperate and arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with two species restricted to the southern part of South America. Species relationships within the genus are highly problematic. The genus has traditionally been divided into two groups, sometimes recognized as sections (Oppositifolia and Alternifolia), based on leaf arrangement, or, alternatively, into 17 series. Based on morphological features, Hara suggested that the genus originated in South America and then subsequently migrated to the Northern Hemisphere. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast gene matK for species of Chrysosplenium to elucidate relationships, test Hara's biogeographic hypothesis for the genus, and examine chromosomal and gynoecial diversification. These analyses revealed that both sections Oppositifolia and Alternifolia are monophyletic and form two large sister clades. Hence, leaf arrangement is a good indicator of relationships within this genus. Hara's series Pilosa and Macrostemon are each also monophyletic; however, series Oppositifolia, Alternifolia, and Nepalensia are clearly not monophyletic. MacClade reconstructions suggest that the genus arose in Eastern Asia, rather than in South America, with several independent migration events from Asia to the New World. In one well-defined subclade, species from eastern and western North America form a discrete clade, with Old World species as their sister group, suggesting that the eastern and western North American taxa diverged following migration to that continent. The South American species forms a clade with species from eastern Asia; this disjunction may be the result of ancient long-distance dispersal. Character mapping demonstrated that gynoecial diversification is dynamic, with reversals from inferior to half-inferior ovaries, as well as to ovaries that appear superior. Chromosomal evolution also appears to be labile with several independent origins of n = 12 (from an original number of n = 11) and multiple episodes of aneuploidy.
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            A new species of Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) from Zhangjiajie, Hunan, central China.

             H Liu,  J. Luo,  Q Liu (2016)
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              FLORAL ANATOMY IN THE SAXIFRAGACEAE SENSU LATO. IV. BAUEROIDEAE AND CONCLUSIONS

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PhytoKeys
                PhytoKeys
                3
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F7FCE910-8E78-573F-9C77-7788555F8AAD
                PhytoKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2011
                1314-2003
                2019
                25 November 2019
                : 135
                : 39-47
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Life Sciences, Multidisciplinary Genome Institute, Hallym University, Chuncheon 24252, South Korea Hallym University Chuncheon South Korea
                [2 ] CAS Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology Daejeon South Korea
                [3 ] International Biological Material Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 34141, South Korea CAS Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia Kunming China
                [4 ] Freshwater Bioresources Research Division, Nakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources, Sangju 37242, South Korea Nakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources, Sangju South Korea
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Young-Dong Kim ( ydkim@ 123456hallym.ac.kr )

                Academic editor: Y. Mutafchiev

                Article
                39036
                10.3897/phytokeys.135.39036
                6887648
                Yong-In Kim, Jae-Seo Shin, Sangwoo Lee, Jia-Hui Chen, Sangho Choi, Jin Hee Park, Young-Dong Kim

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Crassulaceae
                Saxifragaceae
                Nomenclature
                Taxonomy
                Asia
                Far East

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