Blog
About

5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Self-concept clarity and compulsive Internet use: The role of preference for virtual interactions and employment status in British and North-American samples

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background and Aims

          Compulsive Internet Use (CIU) describes a maladaptive relationship with the Internet characterised by loss of control and conflict. Although also affecting adults, most studies use teenage samples, and theoretical development on risk factors is scarce. According to Davis (2001), the social connectivity function of the Internet is key in identifying traits associated with CIU. Since Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) is strongly related to social anxiety, and virtual interactions allow “self-edition”, we hypothesized that individuals low in SCC could choose virtual interactions as safer alternative to satisfy their social needs. This could in turn increase the risk of CIU. Building on a previous study, we also expected CIU to be more harmful in the unemployed.

          Methods

          We collected samples from the UK ( N = 532) and US ( N = 502) with equal distribution of employed and unemployed individuals. We ran Measurement Invariance tests to confirm that the constructs were equivalent across countries. Subsequently, we conducted mediation and moderation analysis to test our hypothesis with Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

          Results

          Measurement Invariance was confirmed. The relationship between SCC and CIU was partially mediated by preference of virtual interactions in both countries. This preference was significantly related to lower social support. Short term unemployment seemed to accentuate the negative impact of CIU on life satisfaction in both countries, although only marginally significantly in the US. The unemployed reported significantly lower levels of life satisfaction.

          Conclusion

          We demonstrated that SCC is a key vulnerability factor to CIU in adults, and confirmed the additional risks for the unemployed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 40

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use

           R.A. Davis (2001)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Structural equations modeling: Fit Indices, sample size, and advanced topics

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Preference for Online Social Interaction: A Theory of Problematic Internet Use and Psychosocial Well-Being

               Scott Caplan (2003)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jba
                JBA
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                J Behav Addict
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                December 2015
                21 December 2015
                : 4
                : 4
                : 289-298
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Open University Business School , Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK
                [ 2 ] Henley Business School , Greenlands Campus, Henley, Reading-on-Thames, UK
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: Cristina Quinones; Open University Business School, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK; Phone: +4401908 632763; E-mail: cristina.quinones-garcia@ 123456open.ac.uk
                Article
                10.1556/2006.4.2015.038
                4712763
                26690624
                © 2015 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 4, Equations: 0, References: 53, Pages: 29
                Funding
                Funding sources: This research was funded by a Small Research Grant from British Academy/Leverhulme Trust.
                Categories
                Full-Length Report

                Comments

                Comment on this article