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      Fluid Intake and Vasopressin: Connecting the Dots

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          Abstract

          In the last decade, cross-sectional and multiple cohort studies have associated total fluid intake or water intake with the risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and even the risk of developing hyperglycemia. Urine biomarkers have also been linked to the risk of CKD and lithiasis, and these biomarkers respond quickly to variations in fluid intake. High circulating copeptin levels, a surrogate marker of arginine vasopressin, have been associated with metabolic syndrome, renal dysfunction and increased risk for diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and death. The aim of this paper was to explore how the various findings on water intake, hydration and health are interconnected, to highlight current gaps in our understanding and to propose a model that links water intake, homeostatic mechanisms to maintain water balance and health outcomes. Since plasma copeptin and vasopressin have been demonstrated to be sensitive to changes in water intake, inversely associated with 24-hour urine volume, and associated with urine biomarkers and fluid intake, vasopressin is proposed as the central player in this theoretical physiological model.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Fluid and nutrient intake and risk of chronic kidney disease.

          We evaluated the association between fluid and nutrient intake and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Two cross-sectional population-based studies. Validated nutrition food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) administered to people >50 years, identified in a door-to-door census of a well-defined suburban area. Based upon nutrition tables we calculated intakes of over 40 nutrients (factors) and total daily energy intake. Primary outcome was CKD. Fluid (total content of fluid and drinks assessed in the FFQ) and nutrient intake was stratified in quintiles and association with CKD analysed by logistic regression, expressed as unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios, with testing for linear trend. The proportion of participants who completed the FFQ and had glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measures was 2744/3654 (75.0%) for the first and 2476/3508 (70.6%) for the second survey. CKD was present in 12.4-23.5% men and 14.9-28.7% women (mean ages 66.4-65.4 years), respectively. Participants who had the highest quintile of fluid intake (3.2 L/day) had a significantly lower risk of CKD (odds ratio 0.5, 95%CI 0.32 to 0.77, P for trend = 0.003). These findings were consistent across both study periods, both equations to calculate GFR and both GFR thresholds. Higher intakes of fluid appear to protect against CKD. CKD may be preventable at a population level with low-cost increased fluid intake. © 2011 The Authors. Nephrology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.
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            Copeptin: clinical use of a new biomarker.

            Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is a key hormone in the human body. Despite the clinical relevance of AVP in maintaining fluid balance and vascular tone, measurement of mature AVP is difficult and subject to preanalytical errors. Recently, copeptin, a 39-amino acid glycopeptide that comprises the C-terminal part of the AVP precursor (CT-proAVP), was found to be a stable and sensitive surrogate marker for AVP release, analogous to C-peptide for insulin. Copeptin measurement has been shown to be useful in various clinical indications, including the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus and the monitoring of sepsis and cardiovascular diseases. Here we review recent findings regarding the relationship between AVP and copeptin, and affirm the value of AVP as a surrogate marker for AVP.
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              Plasma copeptin and the risk of diabetes mellitus.

              Animal studies suggest that the arginine vasopressin system may play a role in glucose metabolism, but data from humans are limited. We analyzed plasma copeptin (copeptin), a stable C-terminal fragment of the arginine vasopressin prohormone. Using baseline and longitudinal data from a Swedish population-based sample (n=4742; mean age, 58 years; 60% women) and multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of increasing quartiles of copeptin (lowest quartile as reference) with prevalent diabetes mellitus at baseline, insulin resistance (top quartile of fasting plasma insulin among nondiabetic subjects), and incident diabetes mellitus on long-term follow-up. New-onset diabetes mellitus was ascertained through 3 national and regional registers. All models were adjusted for clinical and anthropometric risk factors, cystatin C, and C-reactive protein. In cross-sectional analyses, increasing copeptin was associated with prevalent diabetes mellitus (P=0.04) and insulin resistance (P<0.001). During 12.6 years of follow-up, 174 subjects (4%) developed new-onset diabetes mellitus. The odds of developing diabetes mellitus increased across increasing quartiles of copeptin, even after additional adjustment for baseline fasting glucose and insulin (adjusted odds ratios, 1.0, 1.37, 1.79, and 2.09; P for trend=0.004). The association with incident diabetes mellitus remained significant in analyses restricted to subjects with fasting whole blood glucose <5.4 mmol/L at baseline (adjusted odds ratios, 1.0, 1.80, 1.92, and 3.48; P=0.001). Elevated copeptin predicts increased risk for diabetes mellitus independently of established clinical risk factors, including fasting glucose and insulin. These findings could have implications for risk assessment, novel antidiabetic treatments, and metabolic side effects from arginine vasopressin system modulation.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                ANM
                Ann Nutr Metab
                10.1159/issn.0250-6807
                Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism
                Ann Nutr Metab
                S. Karger AG (Basel, Switzerland karger@ 123456karger.com http://www.karger.com )
                978-3-318-05893-2
                978-3-318-05894-9
                0250-6807
                1421-9697
                June 2016
                16 June 2016
                : 68
                : 2
                : 6-11
                Affiliations
                Hydration and Health Department, Danone Research, Palaiseau, France
                Article
                ANM2016068S02006 Ann Nutr Metab 2016;68(suppl 2):6-11
                10.1159/000446198
                27299303
                © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel

                This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND). Usage and distribution for commercial purposes as well as any distribution of modified material requires written permission. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, References: 30, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Proceedings

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