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      Virus in Semen and the Risk of Sexual Transmission

      1
      New England Journal of Medicine
      New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM/MMS)

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          Favipiravir and Ribavirin Treatment of Epidemiologically Linked Cases of Lassa Fever.

          Two patients with Lassa fever are described who are the first human cases treated with a combination of ribavirin and favipiravir. Both patients survived but developed transaminitis and had prolonged detectable virus RNA in blood and semen, suggesting that the possibility of sexual transmission of Lassa virus should be considered.
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            Update: Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus - United States, July 2016.

            Zika virus has been identified as a cause of congenital microcephaly and other serious brain defects (1). CDC issued interim guidance for the prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus on February 5, 2016, with an initial update on April 1, 2016 (2). The following recommendations apply to all men and women who have traveled to or reside in areas with active Zika virus transmission* and their sex partners. The recommendations in this report replace those previously issued and are now updated to reduce the risk for sexual transmission of Zika virus from both men and women to their sex partners. This guidance defines potential sexual exposure to Zika virus as having had sex with a person who has traveled to or lives in an area with active Zika virus transmission when the sexual contact did not include a barrier to protect against infection. Such barriers include male or female condoms for vaginal or anal sex and other barriers for oral sex.(†) Sexual exposure includes vaginal sex, anal sex, oral sex, or other activities that might expose a sex partner to genital secretions.(§) This guidance will be updated as more information becomes available.
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              Confronting Ebola as a Sexually Transmitted Infection.

              The unprecedented Ebola outbreak that devastated West Africa evolved within months from a regional outbreak to a global public health emergency. While the rate of confirmed cases declined dramatically, sporadic clusters of Ebola virus disease (EVD) continue well beyond the double incubation period of 42 days used to declare a nation Ebola-free. At the same time, evidence that the virus persists in genital fluids and can be sexually transmitted, along with the potential for lingering virus in other body compartments to permit recrudescence of EVD, has shaken our thinking of what it takes to achieve lasting control of an Ebola epidemic. A comprehensive response to the threat of persistence and sexual transmission of Ebola is required and should build on accessible longitudinal medical care of survivors and accurate genital fluid testing for Ebola. Control of this and future Ebola outbreaks will depend on our ability to recognize and respond to this persistence of the virus in those who survive.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                New England Journal of Medicine
                N Engl J Med
                New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM/MMS)
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                April 12 2018
                April 12 2018
                : 378
                : 15
                : 1440-1441
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT.
                Article
                10.1056/NEJMe1803212
                6414222
                29641967
                908a62f4-c4d1-491f-a301-a025e6badae6
                © 2018
                History

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