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      From potential to practical: conserving bees in urban public green spaces

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      Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

      Wiley

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          Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation

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            LINKING BEES AND FLOWERS: HOW DO FLORAL COMMUNITIES STRUCTURE POLLINATOR COMMUNITIES?

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              Where is the UK's pollinator biodiversity? The importance of urban areas for flower-visiting insects

              Insect pollinators provide a crucial ecosystem service, but are under threat. Urban areas could be important for pollinators, though their value relative to other habitats is poorly known. We compared pollinator communities using quantified flower-visitation networks in 36 sites (each 1 km2) in three landscapes: urban, farmland and nature reserves. Overall, flower-visitor abundance and species richness did not differ significantly between the three landscape types. Bee abundance did not differ between landscapes, but bee species richness was higher in urban areas than farmland. Hoverfly abundance was higher in farmland and nature reserves than urban sites, but species richness did not differ significantly. While urban pollinator assemblages were more homogeneous across space than those in farmland or nature reserves, there was no significant difference in the numbers of rarer species between the three landscapes. Network-level specialization was higher in farmland than urban sites. Relative to other habitats, urban visitors foraged from a greater number of plant species (higher generality) but also visited a lower proportion of available plant species (higher specialization), both possibly driven by higher urban plant richness. Urban areas are growing, and improving their value for pollinators should be part of any national strategy to conserve and restore pollinators.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
                Front Ecol Environ
                Wiley
                1540-9295
                1540-9309
                April 2019
                April 2019
                March 04 2019
                April 2019
                : 17
                : 3
                : 167-175
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The Ohio State UniversityDepartment of Entomology Columbus OH
                Article
                10.1002/fee.2015
                © 2019

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