Blog
About

32
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The Elements of a Life: Lauren Redniss’s Graphic Biography of Marie Curie

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This article explores how Lauren Redniss’s Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout ( 2010) uses expressive drawings, lettering, layouts, tableaus, colour, photographs and archival documents to challenge traditional biographical conventions. Drawing on art history, comics studies, feminist science history, and biography theory, it proposes that Radioactive initially invites readers into the pleasures of intimate knowledge of a complex female figure through alluring hand-drawn visual sequences that recreate both Curie’s era and aura. However, this romanticized and even eroticized view of the subject shifts as the graphic biography of Marie Curie transforms into the graphic biography of her primary discovery, the element radium, and the later twentieth century tragedies of atomic warfare and nuclear fallout. The article concludes that Radioactive is an experiment in graphic biography that highlights how the border between the seen and the unseen cuts across atomic science, biographical narrative, and visual storytelling.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 8

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The Many Lives of Marie Curie

           N Pasachoff (2005)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The seven sisters: subgenres of bioi of contemporary life scientists.

            Today, scientific biography is primarily thought of as a way of writing contextual history of science. But the genre has other functions as well. This article discusses seven kinds of ideal-typical subgenres of scientific biography. In addition to its mainstream function as an ancilla historiae, it is also frequently used to enrich the understanding of the individual construction of scientific knowledge, to promote the public engagement with science, and as a substitute for belles-lettres. Currently less acknowledged kinds of scientific biography include its use as a medium for public and private, respectively, commemoration. Finally, the use of scientific biography as a research (virtue) ethical genre, providing examples of 'the good life in science', is emphasized.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              “This Week in Comics!”

               J McCulloch (2017)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2048-0792
                The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship
                Open Library of Humanities
                2048-0792
                24 February 2020
                2020
                : 10
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Winnipeg, CA
                Article
                10.16995/cg.178
                Copyright: © 2020 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Research

                Literary studies

                graphic biography, Marie Curie, science comics, women in comics

                Comments

                Comment on this article