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Evaluation of the Persian version of modified fatigue impact scale in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

Iranian Journal of Neurology

Tehran University of Medical Sciences

modified fatigue impact scale, multiple sclerosis, persian translation, fatigue

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      Abstract

      Background Fatigue, a major cause of disability in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), is associated with reduced quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and reproducibility of the Persian version of Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) in Iranian patients with MS. Methods This study included 15 subjects with clinically definite MS, 15 hospitalized patients with MS, and 15 hospitalized patients with other chronic illnesses (as controls). They filled in the Persian version of the MFIS twice with a three-day interval. MFIS items were analyzed and the correlation coefficient was calculated. Results There was a good correlation between the scores of the two measurements (correlation coefficient: 0.984, P < 0.001) especially in physical and cognitive subgroups. The reproducibility of psychosocial subscale was lower than physical and cognitive subscales. Conclusion According to our findings, the Persian version of the MFIS has a good reliability and reproducibility for assessment of fatigue in patients with MS.

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      Most cited references 26

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      Factors influencing quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: disability, depressive mood, fatigue and sleep quality.

      In a series of 504 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), quality of life (QOL) and its main clinical and demographic determinants were assessed in comparison with healthy individuals. A postal questionnaire with self-completed measures of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS), QOL (Quality of Life Index, QLI), depressive mood (Self-rating Depression Scale, SDS), fatigue severity (Fatigue Severity Scale, FSS) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, PSQI) was sent to this sample of MS patients. Most patients were severely disabled; almost half were mildly to severely depressed, suffering from reduced sleep quality and/or fatigue. The multiple sclerosis patients had significantly lower QLI scores than healthy controls. EDSS and SDS scores were found to be predictors of global QLI score. Regarding the different QLI domains, mean SDS scores remained predictive for all QLI items, while mean EDSS, PSQI and FSS scores were only predictive for physical domains. Our study clearly demonstrates that depressive mood is the main factor influencing QOL. The disability status, fatigue and reduced sleep quality have an impact mainly on physical domains of life quality.
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        The Sonya Slifka Longitudinal Multiple Sclerosis Study: methods and sample characteristics.

        The Sonya Slifka Longitudinal Multiple Sclerosis Study follows a population-based cohort of approximately 2000 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to study demographic and clinical characteristics, course of illness, utilization and cost of health services, provider characteristics, use of MS specialists and disease modifying agents, and neurologic, economic and psychosocial outcomes. This report describes the study methodology, presents baseline demographic and clinical data, and evaluates the representativeness of the sample. A stratified random sample of persons with established and recently-diagnosed MS selected from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) mailing lists was supplemented with recently-diagnosed patients recruited through systematic nationwide outreach. Baseline data were collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews derived from standardized instruments; data collection continues at six-month intervals. The cohort was comparable to population-based and clinical samples with respect to demographics, course, relapse rate, symptoms, and severity of disability. Almost two-thirds of the cohort needed help with activities of daily living, three-quarters were limited in work or other activities, and half had emotional problems that compromised quality of life. The Slifka Study cohort is broadly representative of the MS population and the database can be used to address questions not answered by natural history studies, clinical databases, or population-based surveys.
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          Pilot study of Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng) to improve cancer-related fatigue: a randomized, double-blind, dose-finding evaluation: NCCTG trial N03CA.

          This pilot trial sought to investigate whether any of three doses of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) might help cancer-related fatigue. A secondary aim was to evaluate toxicity. Eligible adults with cancer were randomized in a double-blind manner, to receive American ginseng in doses of 750, 1,000, or 2,000 mg/day or placebo given in twice daily dosing over 8 weeks. Outcome measures included the Brief Fatigue Inventory, vitality subscale of the Medical Outcome Scale Short Form-36 (SF-36), and the Global Impression of Benefit Scale at 4 and 8 weeks. Two hundred ninety patients were accrued to this trial. Nonsignificant trends for all outcomes were seen in favor of the 1,000- and 2,000-mg/day doses of American ginseng. Area under the curve analysis of activity interference from the Brief Fatigue Inventory was 460-467 in the placebo group and 750 mg/day group versus 480-551 in the 1,000- and 2,000-mg/day arms, respectively. Change from baseline in the vitality subscale of the SF-36 was 7.3-7.8 in the placebo and the 750-mg/day arm, versus 10.5-14.6 in the 1,000- and 2,000-mg/day arms. Over twice as many patients on ginseng perceived a benefit and were satisfied with treatment over those on placebo. There were no significant differences in any measured toxicities between any of the arms. There appears to be some activity and tolerable toxicity at 1,000-2,000 mg/day doses of American ginseng with regard to cancer-related fatigue. Thus, further study of American ginseng is warranted.
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            3829268

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