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      Repurposing CRISPR as an RNA-guided platform for sequence-specific control of gene expression.

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          Abstract

          Targeted gene regulation on a genome-wide scale is a powerful strategy for interrogating, perturbing, and engineering cellular systems. Here, we develop a method for controlling gene expression based on Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease from a type II CRISPR system. We show that a catalytically dead Cas9 lacking endonuclease activity, when coexpressed with a guide RNA, generates a DNA recognition complex that can specifically interfere with transcriptional elongation, RNA polymerase binding, or transcription factor binding. This system, which we call CRISPR interference (CRISPRi), can efficiently repress expression of targeted genes in Escherichia coli, with no detectable off-target effects. CRISPRi can be used to repress multiple target genes simultaneously, and its effects are reversible. We also show evidence that the system can be adapted for gene repression in mammalian cells. This RNA-guided DNA recognition platform provides a simple approach for selectively perturbing gene expression on a genome-wide scale.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Cell
          Cell
          Elsevier BV
          1097-4172
          0092-8674
          Feb 28 2013
          : 152
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] UCSF Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. stanley.qi@ucsf.edu
          Article
          S0092-8674(13)00211-0 NIHMS454244
          10.1016/j.cell.2013.02.022
          3664290
          23452860
          92e54354-6e9b-46ae-93c2-238879dc351e
          Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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