Blog
About

2,365
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    153
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Estimates of worldwide burden of cancer in 2008: GLOBOCAN 2008

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 27 cancers in 2008 have been prepared for 182 countries as part of the GLOBOCAN series published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In this article, we present the results for 20 world regions, summarizing the global patterns for the eight most common cancers. Overall, an estimated 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occur in 2008, with 56% of new cancer cases and 63% of the cancer deaths occurring in the less developed regions of the world. The most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide are lung (1.61 million, 12.7% of the total), breast (1.38 million, 10.9%) and colorectal cancers (1.23 million, 9.7%). The most common causes of cancer death are lung cancer (1.38 million, 18.2% of the total), stomach cancer (738,000 deaths, 9.7%) and liver cancer (696,000 deaths, 9.2%). Cancer is neither rare anywhere in the world, nor mainly confined to high-resource countries. Striking differences in the patterns of cancer from region to region are observed. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 16

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in Europe in 2008.

          Up-to-date statistics on cancer occurrence and outcome are essential for the planning and evaluation of programmes for cancer control. Since the relevant information for 2008 is not generally available as yet, we used statistical models to estimate incidence and mortality data for 25 cancers in 40 European countries (grouped and individually) in 2008. The calculations are based on published data. If not collected, national rates were estimated from national mortality data and incidence and mortality data provided by local cancer registries of the same or neighbouring country. The estimated 2008 rates were applied to the corresponding country population estimates for 2008 to obtain an estimate of the numbers of cancer cases and deaths in Europe in 2008. There were an estimated 3.2 million new cases of cancer and 1.7 million deaths from cancer in 2008. The most common cancers were colorectal cancers (436,000 cases, 13.6% of the total), breast cancer (421,000, 13.1%), lung cancer (391,000, 12.2%) and prostate cancer (382,000, 11.9%). The most common causes of death from cancer were lung cancer (342,000 deaths, 19.9% of the total), colorectal cancer (212,000 deaths, 12.3%), breast cancer (129,000, 7.5%) and stomach cancer (117,000, 6.8%). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Estimates of the worldwide incidence of 25 major cancers in 1990.

             D Parkin,  J Ferlay,  P Pisani (1999)
            The annual incidence rates (crude and age-standardized) and numbers of new cases of 25 different cancers have been estimated for the year 1990 in 23 areas of the world. The total number of new cancer cases (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) was 8.1 million, just over half of which occur in the developing countries. The most common cancer in the world today is lung cancer, accounting for 18% of cancers of men worldwide, and 21% of cancers in men in the developed countries. Stomach cancer is second in frequency (almost 10% of all new cancers) and breast cancer, by far the most common cancer among women (21% of the total), is third. There are large differences in the relative frequency of different cancers by world area. The major cancers of developed countries (other than the 3 already named) are cancers of the colon-rectum and prostate, and in developing countries, cancers of the cervix uteri and esophagus. The implications of these patterns for cancer control, and specifically prevention, are discussed. Tobacco smoking and chewing are almost certainly the major preventable causes of cancer today.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Estimates of the worldwide incidence of eighteen major cancers in 1985.

               P Pisani,  J Ferlay,  D Parkin (1993)
              The annual incidence rates (crude and age-standardized) and numbers of new cases of 18 different cancers have been estimated for the year 1985 in 24 areas of the world. The total number of new cancer cases (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) was 7.6 million, 52% of which occur in developing countries. The most common cancer in the world today is lung cancer, accounting for 17.6% of cancers of men worldwide, and 22% of cancers in men in the developed countries. Stomach cancer is now second in frequency (it was slightly more common than lung cancer in 1980) and breast cancer--by far the most important cancer of women (19.1% of the total)--is third. There are very large differences in the relative importance of the different cancers by world area. The major cancers of developed countries (other than the 3 already named) are cancers of the colon-rectum and prostate, and, in developing countries, cancers of the cervix uteri, mouth and pharynx, liver and oesophagus. The implications of these patterns for cancer control, and specifically prevention, are discussed. Tobacco smoking and chewing are almost certainly the major preventable causes of cancer today.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Cancer
                Int. J. Cancer
                Wiley
                00207136
                December 15 2010
                December 15 2010
                June 17 2010
                : 127
                : 12
                : 2893-2917
                Article
                10.1002/ijc.25516
                21351269
                © 2010

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ijc.25516

                Comments

                Comment on this article