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      The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease

      1 , 2

      Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology

      SAGE Publications

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          Most cited references 38

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          Guidelines on the diagnosis and management of iron deficiency and anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases.

          Anemia is a common complication of inflammatory bowel diseases. An international working party has formed and developed guidelines for evaluation and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency that should serve practicing gastroenterologists. Within a total of 16 statements, recommendations are made regarding diagnostic measures to screen for iron- and other anemia-related deficiencies regarding the triggers for medical intervention, treatment goals, and appropriate therapies. Anemia is a common cause of hospitalization, prevents physicians from discharging hospitalized patients, and is one of the most frequent comorbid conditions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It therefore needs appropriate attention and specific care.
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            A novel intravenous iron formulation for treatment of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: the ferric carboxymaltose (FERINJECT) randomized controlled trial.

            Anemia is a common complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) This multicenter study tested the noninferiority and safety of a new intravenous iron preparation, ferric carboxymaltose (FeCarb), in comparison with oral ferrous sulfate (FeSulf) in reducing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in IBD. Two hundred patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (137 FeCarb:63 FeSulf) to receive FeCarb (maximum 1,000 mg iron per infusion) at 1-wk intervals until the patients' calculated total iron deficit was reached or FeSulf (100 mg b.i.d.) for 12 wk. The primary end point was change in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline to week 12. The median Hb improved from 8.7 to 12.3 g/dL in the FeCarb group and from 9.1 to 12.1 g/dL in the FeSulf group, demonstrating noninferiority (P= 0.6967). Response (defined as Hb increase of >2.0 g/dL) was higher for FeCarb at week 2 (P= 0.0051) and week 4 (P= 0.0346). Median ferritin increased from 5.0 to 323.5 mug/L at week 2, followed by a continuous decrease in the FeCarb group (43.5 mug/L at week 12). In the FeSulf group, a moderate increase from 6.5 to 28.5 mug/L at week 12 was observed. Treatment-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in 28.5% of the FeCarb and 22.2% of the FeSulf groups, with discontinuation of study medication due to AEs in 1.5% and 7.9%, respectively. FeCarb is effective and safe in IBD-associated anemia. It is noninferior to FeSulf in terms of Hb change over 12 wk, and provides a fast Hb increase and a sufficient refill of iron stores.
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              Iron, anaemia, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

              Iron deficiency anaemia is one of the most common disorders in the world. Also, one third of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients suffer from recurrent anaemia. Anaemia has significant impact on the quality of life of affected patients. Chronic fatigue, a frequent IBD symptom itself, is commonly caused by anaemia and may debilitate patients as much as abdominal pain or diarrhoea. Common therapeutic targets are the mechanisms behind anaemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency. It is our experience that virtually all patients with IBD associated anaemia can be successfully treated with a combination of iron sucrose and erythropoietin, which then may positively affect the misled immune response in IBD.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
                Therap Adv Gastroenterol
                SAGE Publications
                1756-283X
                1756-2848
                October 22 2015
                January 2016
                November 22 2015
                January 2016
                : 9
                : 1
                : 76-85
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA
                [2 ]Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Houston Methodist Hospital, 6550 Fannin St. Suite 1001, Houston, TX 77030, USA
                Article
                10.1177/1756283X15616577
                © 2016

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