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      Heterogeneous sulfate aerosol formation mechanisms during wintertime Chinese haze events: Air quality model assessment using observations of sulfate oxygen isotopes in Beijing

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          Abstract

          <p><strong>Abstract.</strong> Air quality models have not been able to reproduce the magnitude of the observed concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM<sub>2.5</sub>) during wintertime Chinese haze events. The discrepancy has been at least partly attributed to low biases in modeled sulfate production rates due to the lack of heterogeneous sulfate production on aerosols in the models. In this study, we explicitly implement four heterogeneous sulfate formation mechanisms into a regional chemical transport model, in addition to gas-phase and in-cloud sulfate production. We compare the model results with observations of sulfate concentrations and oxygen isotopes (&amp;Delta;<sup>17</sup>O(SO<sub>4</sub><sup>2&amp;minus;</sup>)) in the winter of 2014&amp;ndash;2015, the latter of which is highly sensitive to the relative importance of different sulfate production mechanisms. Model results suggest that heterogeneous sulfate production on aerosols accounts for about 20 % of sulfate production in clean and polluted conditions, partially reducing the modeled low bias in sulfate concentrations. Model sensitivity studies in comparison with the &amp;Delta;<sup>17</sup>O(SO<sub>4</sub><sup>2&amp;minus;</sup>) observations suggest that heterogeneous sulfate formation is dominated by transition metal ion catalyzed oxidation of SO<sub>2</sub>.</p>

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions
          Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss.
          Copernicus GmbH
          1680-7375
          January 14 2019
          : 1-28
          Article
          10.5194/acp-2018-1352
          9333eb43-7652-44a9-b4a6-b0a810f73a86
          © 2019

          https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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