Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

Post-Newtonian templates for binary black-hole inspirals: the effect of the horizon fluxes and the secular change in the black-hole masses and spins

,

Classical and Quantum Gravity

IOP Publishing

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 126

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

      On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of \(1.0 \times 10^{-21}\). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 {\sigma}. The source lies at a luminosity distance of \(410^{+160}_{-180}\) Mpc corresponding to a redshift \(z = 0.09^{+0.03}_{-0.04}\). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are \(36^{+5}_{-4} M_\odot\) and \(29^{+4}_{-4} M_\odot\), and the final black hole mass is \(62^{+4}_{-4} M_\odot\), with \(3.0^{+0.5}_{-0.5} M_\odot c^2\) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals.These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: found
        Is Open Access

        GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

        We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5 \(\sigma\). The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of \(3.4_{-0.9}^{+0.7} \times 10^{-22}\). The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are \(14.2_{-3.7}^{+8.3} M_{\odot}\) and \(7.5_{-2.3}^{+2.3} M_{\odot}\) and the final black hole mass is \(20.8_{-1.7}^{+6.1} M_{\odot}\). We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2. This source is located at a luminosity distance of \(440_{-190}^{+180}\) Mpc corresponding to a redshift \(0.09_{-0.04}^{+0.03}\). All uncertainties define a 90 % credible interval. This second gravitational-wave observation provides improved constraints on stellar populations and on deviations from general relativity.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Gravitational Radiation and the Motion of Two Point Masses

            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            Classical and Quantum Gravity
            Class. Quantum Grav.
            IOP Publishing
            0264-9381
            1361-6382
            January 25 2018
            January 25 2018
            December 14 2017
            : 35
            : 2
            : 024001
            10.1088/1361-6382/aa96c5
            © 2017

            http://iopscience.iop.org/info/page/text-and-data-mining

            http://iopscience.iop.org/page/copyright

            Comments

            Comment on this article