15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Effects of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on trace elements in morbid obesity

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Abstract. Objective: The relationship between obesity and trace elements and possible alterations of trace elements after bariatric surgery is a complex issue. The aim of our study was to determine the level of serum trace elements in morbidly obese patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and methods: The individuals in our study were divided into two groups: Morbidly obese patients who had undergone LSG (n = 30) and a healthy control group (n = 30). Serum zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), iron (Fe), and magnesium (Mg) levels and biochemical parameters were analyzed pre-operatively and post-operatively at months 1 and 12 in both groups. Results: Serum Zn levels in the 1 st and 12 th post-operative months were lower than before the surgery. Patients with morbid obesity had higher serum Cu levels than controls, whereas post-operative serum Cu levels at months 1 and 12 were lower than they had been in the morbidly obese group before surgery. Serum Se and Fe levels of the morbid obesity group were lower than those of the control group, also serum Se levels at post-operative months 1 and 12 were higher than before surgery. The post-operative serum Fe level at 12 months was higher than before surgery, and post-operative serum Mg levels at 1 and 12 months were higher than before surgery. Blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride levels were decreased, and albumin, total protein, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were increased after LSG. Conclusion: In conclusion, we determined the alterations in the levels of trace elements and biochemical parameters in obesity following LSG surgery. Our findings suggest that LSG may have an important role in trace element metabolism and biochemical parameters associated with metabolic diseases in obesity.


          Related collections

          Most cited references34

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Copper, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, and zinc levels in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients.

          There is accumulating evidence that the metabolism of several trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus and that these nutrients might have specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of this disease. The aim of present study was to compare the level of essential trace elements, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of patients who have diabetes mellitus type 2 (n = 257), with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 166), age ranged (45-75) of both genders. The element concentrations were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-induced acid digestion. The validity and accuracy was checked by conventional wet-acid-digestion method and using certified reference materials. The overall recoveries of all elements were found in the range of (97.60-99.49%) of certified values. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Zn, Mn, and Cr were significantly reduced in blood and scalp-hair samples of diabetic patients as compared to control subjects of both genders (p < 0.001). The urinary levels of these elements were found to be higher in the diabetic patients than in the age-matched healthy controls. In contrast, high mean values of Cu and Fe were detected in scalp hair and blood from patients versus the nondiabetic subjects, but the differences found in blood samples was not significant (p < 0.05). These results are consistent with those obtained in other studies, confirming that deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Review: long-term impact of bariatric surgery on body weight, comorbidities, and nutritional status.

            The number of patients who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and gastric banding (GB) surgeries has increased dramatically over the past decade, yet the long-term impact of these surgeries on body weight, comorbidities, and nutritional status remains unclear, as do the mechanisms of weight regain. The articles were found via PubMed searches. To review the impact of bariatric surgery on weight maintenance and comorbidities, only articles with a postoperative follow-up of 3 yr or longer were included. The articles on nutritional status had a follow-up of 12 months or longer. RYGB and GB surgeries lead to substantial weight loss in individuals with morbid obesity. However, significant weight regain occurs over the long term, and according to the only well-designed prospective controlled study, the improvement in comorbidities associated with weight loss mitigates in the long term on weight regain. There is some evidence from a retrospective study that RYGB surgery is associated with a modest decrease in long-term mortality. These results remain to be substantiated by well-designed, long-term, randomized and prospective controlled studies. The mechanisms that lead to weight regain need to be further examined and may include increase in energy intake due to enlargement of stoma and adaptive changes in the levels of gut and adipocyte hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, which regulate energy intake; decrease in physical activity; changes in energy expenditure; and other factors. In addition to weight regain, RYGB surgery is associated with frequent incidence of iron, vitamin B12, folate, calcium, and vitamin D deficiency, which requires regular supplementation and monitoring.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: More than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

              Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in bariatric surgery. These benefits have been associated with different pathophysiologic mechanisms unrelated to weight loss such as increased gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and activation of hormonal mechanisms such as increased GLP-1 hormone and decreased ghrelin. The aim of this review was to highlight the salient aspects of SG regarding its historical evolution, pathophysiologic mechanisms, main results, clinical applications and perioperative complications.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Trace Elements and Electrolytes
                TE
                Dustri-Verlgag Dr. Karl Feistle
                0946-2104
                December 03 2019
                Article
                10.5414/TEX01605
                9376445b-57bb-465f-8684-2c4b89cc72e8
                © 2019

                Endocrinology & Diabetes,General medicine,Medicine,Gastroenterology & Hepatology,Nutrition & Dietetics
                trace elements,glucose
,morbid obesity,cholesterol,laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

                Comments

                Comment on this article