Blog
About

55
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A Trial of Lopinavir–Ritonavir in Adults Hospitalized with Severe Covid-19

      , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.S., , M.D., , M.S., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.S., , M.D., , Ph.D., , M.D., , Ph.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.S., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.S., , M.S., , M.S., , M.S., , M.S., , M.S., , Ph.D., , M.D., , Ph.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D., , M.D.

      The New England Journal of Medicine

      Massachusetts Medical Society

      Keyword part (code): 18Keyword part (keyword): Infectious DiseaseKeyword part (code): 18_1Keyword part (keyword): Infectious Disease GeneralKeyword part (code): 18_6Keyword part (keyword): Viral InfectionsKeyword part (code): 18_9Keyword part (keyword): Global HealthKeyword part (code): 18_11Keyword part (keyword): Influenza , 18, Infectious Disease, Keyword part (code): 18_1Keyword part (keyword): Infectious Disease GeneralKeyword part (code): 18_6Keyword part (keyword): Viral InfectionsKeyword part (code): 18_9Keyword part (keyword): Global HealthKeyword part (code): 18_11Keyword part (keyword): Influenza , 18_1, Infectious Disease General, 18_6, Viral Infections, 18_9, Global Health, 18_11, Influenza

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          No therapeutics have yet been proven effective for the treatment of severe illness caused by SARS-CoV-2.

          Methods

          We conducted a randomized, controlled, open-label trial involving hospitalized adult patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, which causes the respiratory illness Covid-19, and an oxygen saturation (Sa o 2) of 94% or less while they were breathing ambient air or a ratio of the partial pressure of oxygen (Pa o 2) to the fraction of inspired oxygen (Fi o 2) of less than 300 mm Hg. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either lopinavir–ritonavir (400 mg and 100 mg, respectively) twice a day for 14 days, in addition to standard care, or standard care alone. The primary end point was the time to clinical improvement, defined as the time from randomization to either an improvement of two points on a seven-category ordinal scale or discharge from the hospital, whichever came first.

          Results

          A total of 199 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection underwent randomization; 99 were assigned to the lopinavir–ritonavir group, and 100 to the standard-care group. Treatment with lopinavir–ritonavir was not associated with a difference from standard care in the time to clinical improvement (hazard ratio for clinical improvement, 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 1.72). Mortality at 28 days was similar in the lopinavir–ritonavir group and the standard-care group (19.2% vs. 25.0%; difference, −5.8 percentage points; 95% CI, −17.3 to 5.7). The percentages of patients with detectable viral RNA at various time points were similar. In a modified intention-to-treat analysis, lopinavir–ritonavir led to a median time to clinical improvement that was shorter by 1 day than that observed with standard care (hazard ratio, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.91). Gastrointestinal adverse events were more common in the lopinavir–ritonavir group, but serious adverse events were more common in the standard-care group. Lopinavir–ritonavir treatment was stopped early in 13 patients (13.8%) because of adverse events.

          Conclusions

          In hospitalized adult patients with severe Covid-19, no benefit was observed with lopinavir–ritonavir treatment beyond standard care. Future trials in patients with severe illness may help to confirm or exclude the possibility of a treatment benefit. (Funded by Major Projects of National Science and Technology on New Drug Creation and Development and others; Chinese Clinical Trial Register number, ChiCTR2000029308.)

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Clinical features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China

          Summary Background A recent cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, China, was caused by a novel betacoronavirus, the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). We report the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and treatment and clinical outcomes of these patients. Methods All patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were admitted to a designated hospital in Wuhan. We prospectively collected and analysed data on patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection by real-time RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. Data were obtained with standardised data collection forms shared by WHO and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium from electronic medical records. Researchers also directly communicated with patients or their families to ascertain epidemiological and symptom data. Outcomes were also compared between patients who had been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and those who had not. Findings By Jan 2, 2020, 41 admitted hospital patients had been identified as having laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection. Most of the infected patients were men (30 [73%] of 41); less than half had underlying diseases (13 [32%]), including diabetes (eight [20%]), hypertension (six [15%]), and cardiovascular disease (six [15%]). Median age was 49·0 years (IQR 41·0–58·0). 27 (66%) of 41 patients had been exposed to Huanan seafood market. One family cluster was found. Common symptoms at onset of illness were fever (40 [98%] of 41 patients), cough (31 [76%]), and myalgia or fatigue (18 [44%]); less common symptoms were sputum production (11 [28%] of 39), headache (three [8%] of 38), haemoptysis (two [5%] of 39), and diarrhoea (one [3%] of 38). Dyspnoea developed in 22 (55%) of 40 patients (median time from illness onset to dyspnoea 8·0 days [IQR 5·0–13·0]). 26 (63%) of 41 patients had lymphopenia. All 41 patients had pneumonia with abnormal findings on chest CT. Complications included acute respiratory distress syndrome (12 [29%]), RNAaemia (six [15%]), acute cardiac injury (five [12%]) and secondary infection (four [10%]). 13 (32%) patients were admitted to an ICU and six (15%) died. Compared with non-ICU patients, ICU patients had higher plasma levels of IL2, IL7, IL10, GSCF, IP10, MCP1, MIP1A, and TNFα. Interpretation The 2019-nCoV infection caused clusters of severe respiratory illness similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and was associated with ICU admission and high mortality. Major gaps in our knowledge of the origin, epidemiology, duration of human transmission, and clinical spectrum of disease need fulfilment by future studies. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 99 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China: a descriptive study

            Summary Background In December, 2019, a pneumonia associated with the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) emerged in Wuhan, China. We aimed to further clarify the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 2019-nCoV pneumonia. Methods In this retrospective, single-centre study, we included all confirmed cases of 2019-nCoV in Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital from Jan 1 to Jan 20, 2020. Cases were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and were analysed for epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and radiological features and laboratory data. Outcomes were followed up until Jan 25, 2020. Findings Of the 99 patients with 2019-nCoV pneumonia, 49 (49%) had a history of exposure to the Huanan seafood market. The average age of the patients was 55·5 years (SD 13·1), including 67 men and 32 women. 2019-nCoV was detected in all patients by real-time RT-PCR. 50 (51%) patients had chronic diseases. Patients had clinical manifestations of fever (82 [83%] patients), cough (81 [82%] patients), shortness of breath (31 [31%] patients), muscle ache (11 [11%] patients), confusion (nine [9%] patients), headache (eight [8%] patients), sore throat (five [5%] patients), rhinorrhoea (four [4%] patients), chest pain (two [2%] patients), diarrhoea (two [2%] patients), and nausea and vomiting (one [1%] patient). According to imaging examination, 74 (75%) patients showed bilateral pneumonia, 14 (14%) patients showed multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity, and one (1%) patient had pneumothorax. 17 (17%) patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and, among them, 11 (11%) patients worsened in a short period of time and died of multiple organ failure. Interpretation The 2019-nCoV infection was of clustering onset, is more likely to affect older males with comorbidities, and can result in severe and even fatal respiratory diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. In general, characteristics of patients who died were in line with the MuLBSTA score, an early warning model for predicting mortality in viral pneumonia. Further investigation is needed to explore the applicability of the MuLBSTA score in predicting the risk of mortality in 2019-nCoV infection. Funding National Key R&D Program of China.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found

              Clinical Characteristics of 138 Hospitalized Patients With 2019 Novel Coronavirus–Infected Pneumonia in Wuhan, China

              In December 2019, novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)-infected pneumonia (NCIP) occurred in Wuhan, China. The number of cases has increased rapidly but information on the clinical characteristics of affected patients is limited.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                N Engl J Med
                N. Engl. J. Med
                nejm
                The New England Journal of Medicine
                Massachusetts Medical Society
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                18 March 2020
                Affiliations
                From the Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Center of Respiratory Medicine, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Diseases (B.C., Yeming Wang, G.F., F.Z., X.G., Z.L., Y.Z., Hui Li, L.S., C.W.), and the Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences (G.F., X.G.), China–Japan Friendship Hospital, the Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (B.C., Yeming Wang, F.Z., Z.L., Y.Z., Hui Li, C.W.), the Clinical and Research Center of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University (Xingwang Li), Peking University Clinical Research Institute, Peking University First Hospital (C.D.), Tsinghua University School of Medicine (Jiuyang Xu), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (L.S.), NHC Key Laboratory of Systems Biology of Pathogens and Christophe Merieux Laboratory, Institute of Pathogen Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (L.G.), and Peking Union Medical College (L.G., C.W.), Beijing, and Jin Yin-tan Hospital, Wuhan (D.W., W.L., Jingli Wang, L.R., B.S., Y.C., M.W., Jiaan Xia, N.C., Jie Xiang, T.Y., T.B., X.X., L.Z., C.L., Y.Y., H.C., Huadong Li, H.H., S.T., F.G., Y.L., Yuan Wei, K.W., K.L., X.Z., X.D., Z.Q., Sixia Lu, X.H., S.R., Shanshan Luo, Jing Wu, Lu Peng, F.C., Lihong Pan, J.Z., C.J., Juan Wang, Xia Liu, S.W., X.W., Q.G., J.H., H.Z., F.Q., C.H., D.Z.) — all in China; Lancaster University, Lancaster (T.J.), and the University of Oxford, Oxford (P.W.H.) — both in the United Kingdom; and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville (F.G.H.).
                Author notes
                Address reprint requests to Dr. Cao at caobin_ben@ 123456163.com , to Dr. C. Wang at cyh-birm@ 123456263.net , or to Dr. D. Zhang at 1813886398@ 123456qq.com .

                Drs. Cao, Y. Wang, Wen, W. Liu, Jingli Wang, Fan, L. Ruan, Song, Cai, and M. Wei and Drs. D. Zhang and C. Wang contributed equally to this article.

                NJ202003183821908
                10.1056/NEJMoa2001282
                7121492
                32187464
                Copyright © 2020 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.

                This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted re-use, except commercial resale, and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgment of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the Covid-19 pandemic or until revoked in writing. Upon expiration of these permissions, PMC is granted a license to make this article available via PMC and Europe PMC, subject to existing copyright protections.

                Product
                Categories
                Original Article
                Custom metadata
                2020-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
                2020
                03
                18
                17
                00
                00
                -04:00

                Comments

                Comment on this article