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      Supracondylar process syndrome: two cases of median nerve neuropathy due to compression by the ligament of Struthers

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          Abstract

          The supracondylar process is a beak-shaped bony process on the anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. The ligament of Struthers is a fibrous band extending from the tip of the process to the medial epicondyle. The median nerve and brachial artery pass under the ligament of Struthers and consequently can be compressed, causing supracondylar process syndrome. As a rare cause of proximal median nerve entrapment, supracondylar process syndrome is triggered when the median nerve is located in the superficial or deep layer of the ligament of Struthers as a result of anatomical variation. The supracondylar process can be easily detected on X-ray images obtained in oblique views but may not be identified in only anteroposterior or lateral views. In this article, we present 2 cases of supracondylar process syndrome and describe the process of diagnosis and treatment and results of a literature review.

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          Most cited references 9

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          Pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome.

          Dysfunction of the median nerve at the elbow or proximal forearm can characterize two distinct clinical entities: pronator syndrome (PS) or anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) syndrome. PS is characterized by vague volar forearm pain, with median nerve paresthesias and minimal motor findings. AIN syndrome is a pure motor palsy of any or all of the muscles innervated by that nerve: the flexor pollicis longus, the flexor digitorum profundus of the index and middle fingers, and the pronator quadratus. The sites of anatomic compression are essentially the same for both disorders. Typically, the findings of electrodiagnostic studies are normal in patients with PS and abnormal in those with AIN syndrome. PS is a controversial diagnosis and is typically treated nonsurgically. AIN syndrome is increasingly thought to be neuritis and it often resolves spontaneously following prolonged observation. Surgical indications for nerve decompression include persistent symptoms for >6 months in patients with PS or for a minimum of 12 months with no signs of motor improvement in those with AIN syndrome.
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            Entrapment neuropathies of the median nerve at and above the elbow.

            Three surgically verified cases of median nerve entrapment at and above the elbow are reported: one involved a compression of the nerve beneath the Struthers ligament in absence of supracondylar bony spur, and two concerned a compression beneath the lacertus fibrosus bicipitis (aponeurosis musculi bicipitalis brachii). Of the two latter cases, the first entrapment was caused by a hematome and the second the nerve was found to be entrapped between the lactertus and an underlying hypertrophic brachial muscle. The compression mechanisms and clinical and electromyographic findings are presented.
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              • Article: not found

              The clinical anatomy of the supracondylar spur and the ligament of Struthers.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2018
                16 April 2018
                : 11
                : 803-807
                Affiliations
                Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ji-Kang Park, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University, 776 1 Sunhawn-ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju 28644, Korea, Tel +82 43 269 6077, Fax +82 43 274 8719, Email carm0916@ 123456hanmail.net
                Article
                jpr-11-803
                10.2147/JPR.S160861
                5907893
                © 2018 Shon et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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