Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Structural Basis for Diltiazem Block of a Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel

      , , , ,

      Molecular Pharmacology

      American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Voltage-gated calcium channels.

           W Catterall (2011)
          Voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels are key transducers of membrane potential changes into intracellular Ca(2+) transients that initiate many physiological events. There are ten members of the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel family in mammals, and they serve distinct roles in cellular signal transduction. The Ca(V)1 subfamily initiates contraction, secretion, regulation of gene expression, integration of synaptic input in neurons, and synaptic transmission at ribbon synapses in specialized sensory cells. The Ca(V)2 subfamily is primarily responsible for initiation of synaptic transmission at fast synapses. The Ca(V)3 subfamily is important for repetitive firing of action potentials in rhythmically firing cells such as cardiac myocytes and thalamic neurons. This article presents the molecular relationships and physiological functions of these Ca(2+) channel proteins and provides information on their molecular, genetic, physiological, and pharmacological properties.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Crystal structure of a voltage-gated sodium channel in two potentially inactivated states.

            In excitable cells, voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels activate to initiate action potentials and then undergo fast and slow inactivation processes that terminate their ionic conductance. Inactivation is a hallmark of Na(V) channel function and is critical for control of membrane excitability, but the structural basis for this process has remained elusive. Here we report crystallographic snapshots of the wild-type Na(V)Ab channel from Arcobacter butzleri captured in two potentially inactivated states at 3.2 Å resolution. Compared to previous structures of Na(V)Ab channels with cysteine mutations in the pore-lining S6 helices (ref. 4), the S6 helices and the intracellular activation gate have undergone significant rearrangements: one pair of S6 helices has collapsed towards the central pore axis and the other S6 pair has moved outward to produce a striking dimer-of-dimers configuration. An increase in global structural asymmetry is observed throughout our wild-type Na(V)Ab models, reshaping the ion selectivity filter at the extracellular end of the pore, the central cavity and its residues that are analogous to the mammalian drug receptor site, and the lateral pore fenestrations. The voltage-sensing domains have also shifted around the perimeter of the pore module in wild-type Na(V)Ab, compared to the mutant channel, and local structural changes identify a conserved interaction network that connects distant molecular determinants involved in Na(V) channel gating and inactivation. These potential inactivated-state structures provide new insights into Na(V) channel gating and novel avenues to drug development and therapy for a range of debilitating Na(V) channelopathies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Structure of the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.1 at 3.6 Å resolution.

              The voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels convert membrane electrical signals to intracellular Ca(2+)-mediated events. Among the ten subtypes of Cav channel in mammals, Cav1.1 is specified for the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscles. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the rabbit Cav1.1 complex at a nominal resolution of 3.6 Å. The inner gate of the ion-conducting α1-subunit is closed and all four voltage-sensing domains adopt an 'up' conformation, suggesting a potentially inactivated state. The extended extracellular loops of the pore domain, which are stabilized by multiple disulfide bonds, form a windowed dome above the selectivity filter. One side of the dome provides the docking site for the α2δ-1-subunit, while the other side may attract cations through its negative surface potential. The intracellular I-II and III-IV linker helices interact with the β1a-subunit and the carboxy-terminal domain of α1, respectively. Classification of the particles yielded two additional reconstructions that reveal pronounced displacement of β1a and adjacent elements in α1. The atomic model of the Cav1.1 complex establishes a foundation for mechanistic understanding of excitation-contraction coupling and provides a three-dimensional template for molecular interpretations of the functions and disease mechanisms of Cav and Nav channels.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Pharmacology
                Mol Pharmacol
                American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET)
                0026-895X
                1521-0111
                September 10 2019
                October 2019
                October 2019
                August 07 2019
                : 96
                : 4
                : 485-492
                Article
                10.1124/mol.119.117531
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article