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The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2018: updates and expansion to encompass the new guide to IMMUNOPHARMACOLOGY

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      Abstract

      The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, www.guidetopharmacology.org) and its precursor IUPHAR-DB, have captured expert-curated interactions between targets and ligands from selected papers in pharmacology and drug discovery since 2003. This resource continues to be developed in conjunction with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS). As previously described, our unique model of content selection and quality control is based on 96 target-class subcommittees comprising 512 scientists collaborating with in-house curators. This update describes content expansion, new features and interoperability improvements introduced in the 10 releases since August 2015. Our relationship matrix now describes ∼9000 ligands, ∼15 000 binding constants, ∼6000 papers and ∼1700 human proteins. As an important addition, we also introduce our newly funded project for the Guide to IMMUNOPHARMACOLOGY (GtoImmuPdb, www.guidetoimmunopharmacology.org). This has been ‘forked’ from the well-established GtoPdb data model and expanded into new types of data related to the immune system and inflammatory processes. This includes new ligands, targets, pathways, cell types and diseases for which we are recruiting new IUPHAR expert committees. Designed as an immunopharmacological gateway, it also has an emphasis on potential therapeutic interventions.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Deanery of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, UK
            Department of Structural & Molecular Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
            School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
            School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham Medical School, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
            MRC Centre for inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK
            Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK
            Experimental Medicine and Immunotherapeutics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
            Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Australia
            PIQUR Therapeutics, Basel 4057, Switzerland
            Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Unit, School of Pharmacy, Institute for Drug Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112102, Israel
            Spedding Research Solutions SAS, Le Vésinet 78110, France
            Author notes
            To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +44 131 650 2999; Email: jamie.davies@ 123456ed.ac.uk

            These authors contributed equally to the paper as first authors.

            Journal
            Nucleic Acids Res
            Nucleic Acids Res
            nar
            Nucleic Acids Research
            Oxford University Press
            0305-1048
            1362-4962
            04 January 2018
            15 November 2017
            15 November 2017
            : 46
            : Database issue , Database issue
            : D1091-D1106
            29149325 5753190 10.1093/nar/gkx1121 gkx1121
            © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Pages: 16
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            Database Issue

            Genetics

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