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      Antibacterial activity and biofilm inhibition by surface modified titanium alloy medical implants following application of silver, titanium dioxide and hydroxyapatite nanocoatings

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      Nanotoxicology

      Informa UK Limited

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          The bactericidal effect of silver nanoparticles.

          Nanotechnology is expected to open new avenues to fight and prevent disease using atomic scale tailoring of materials. Among the most promising nanomaterials with antibacterial properties are metallic nanoparticles, which exhibit increased chemical activity due to their large surface to volume ratios and crystallographic surface structure. The study of bactericidal nanomaterials is particularly timely considering the recent increase of new resistant strains of bacteria to the most potent antibiotics. This has promoted research in the well known activity of silver ions and silver-based compounds, including silver nanoparticles. The present work studies the effect of silver nanoparticles in the range of 1-100 nm on Gram-negative bacteria using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Our results indicate that the bactericidal properties of the nanoparticles are size dependent, since the only nanoparticles that present a direct interaction with the bacteria preferentially have a diameter of approximately 1-10 nm.
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            Antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles.

            The antimicrobial effects of silver (Ag) ion or salts are well known, but the effects of Ag nanoparticles on microorganisms and antimicrobial mechanism have not been revealed clearly. Stable Ag nanoparticles were prepared and their shape and size distribution characterized by particle characterizer and transmission electron microscopic study. The antimicrobial activity of Ag nanoparticles was investigated against yeast, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. In these tests, Muller Hinton agar plates were used and Ag nanoparticles of various concentrations were supplemented in liquid systems. As results, yeast and E. coli were inhibited at the low concentration of Ag nanoparticles, whereas the growth-inhibitory effects on S. aureus were mild. The free-radical generation effect of Ag nanoparticles on microbial growth inhibition was investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These results suggest that Ag nanoparticles can be used as effective growth inhibitors in various microorganisms, making them applicable to diverse medical devices and antimicrobial control systems.
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              Surface treatments of titanium dental implants for rapid osseointegration.

              The osseointegration rate of titanium dental implants is related to their composition and surface roughness. Rough-surfaced implants favor both bone anchoring and biomechanical stability. Osteoconductive calcium phosphate coatings promote bone healing and apposition, leading to the rapid biological fixation of implants. The different methods used for increasing surface roughness or applying osteoconductive coatings to titanium dental implants are reviewed. Surface treatments, such as titanium plasma-spraying, grit-blasting, acid-etching, anodization or calcium phosphate coatings, and their corresponding surface morphologies and properties are described. Most of these surfaces are commercially available and have proven clinical efficacy (>95% over 5 years). The precise role of surface chemistry and topography on the early events in dental implant osseointegration remain poorly understood. In addition, comparative clinical studies with different implant surfaces are rarely performed. The future of dental implantology should aim to develop surfaces with controlled and standardized topography or chemistry. This approach will be the only way to understand the interactions between proteins, cells and tissues, and implant surfaces. The local release of bone stimulating or resorptive drugs in the peri-implant region may also respond to difficult clinical situations with poor bone quality and quantity. These therapeutic strategies should ultimately enhance the osseointegration process of dental implants for their immediate loading and long-term success.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nanotoxicology
                Nanotoxicology
                Informa UK Limited
                1743-5390
                1743-5404
                March 22 2017
                March 17 2017
                : 11
                : 3
                : 327-338
                Article
                10.1080/17435390.2017.1299890
                © 2017

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