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Agricultural Farm-Related Injuries in Bangladesh and Convenient Design of Working Hand Tools

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Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Hindawi

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      Abstract

      Injuries during cultivation of land are the significant causes of recession for an agricultural country like Bangladesh. Thousands of tools are used in agricultural farm having much probability of getting injury at their workplaces. For the injury prevention, proper hand tool designs need to be recommended with ergonomic evaluations. This paper represents the main causes of agricultural injuries among the Bangladeshi farmers. Effective interventions had been discussed in this paper to reduce the rate of injury. This study was carried out in the Panchagarh district of Bangladesh. Data on 434 agricultural injuries were collected and recorded. About 67% injuries of all incidents were due to hand tools, and the remaining 33% were due to machinery or other sources. Though most of the injuries were not serious, about 22% injuries were greater than or equal to AIS 2 (Abbreviated Injury Scale). The practical implication of this study is to design ergonomically fit agricultural hand tools for Bangladeshi farmers in order to avoid their injuries.

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      Most cited references 24

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      Insurance coverage, medical care use, and short-term health changes following an unintentional injury or the onset of a chronic condition.

       Jack Hadley (2007)
      Given the large and increasing number of uninsured US individuals, identifying the health consequences of being uninsured has assumed increased importance. To compare medical care use and short-term health changes among US uninsured individuals and insured nonelderly individuals following a health shock caused by either an unintentional injury or the onset of a chronic condition. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of longitudinal data from Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (1997-2004) limited to nonelderly individuals whose insurance status was established for 2 months prior to 1 or more unintentional injuries (20 783 cases among 15 866 individuals) and onset of 1 or more chronic conditions (10 485 cases among 7954 individuals). Self-reported medical care use and change in short-term general health status following the health shock. After experiencing a health shock, uninsured individuals were less likely to obtain any medical care (unintentional injury [UI] group: 78.8% uninsured vs 88.7% insured [adjusted odds ratio {AOR}, 0.47; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.43-0.51]; new chronic condition [NCC] group: 81.7% uninsured vs 91.5% insured [AOR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.40-0.50]) and more likely not to have received any recommended follow-up care (UI group: 19.3% uninsured vs 9.2% insured [AOR, 2.59; 95% CI, 2.15-3.11]; NCC group: 9.4% uninsured vs 4.4% insured [AOR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.32-2.06]). Based on the AORs, uninsured individuals with UIs had fewer outpatient visits (6.1% uninsured vs 9.0% insured; AOR, 0.71 [95% CI, 0.63-0.80]), office-based visits (41.8% uninsured vs 57.3% insured; AOR, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.56-0.62]), and prescription medicines (35.5% uninsured vs 35.6% insured; AOR, 0.71 [95% CI, 0.67-0.75]). Uninsured individuals with an NCC had fewer office-based visits (58.9% uninsured vs 68.3% insured; AOR, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.72-0.82]) and prescription medicines (52.7% uninsured vs 61.7% insured; AOR, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.57-0.76]). Higher proportions of uninsured individuals reported a decrease in health status (classified as much worse) approximately 3.5 months after the health shock (UI group: 9.8% uninsured vs 6.7% insured; AOR, 0.86 [95% CI, 0.75-0.98]; NCC group: 12.3% uninsured vs 10.1% insured; AOR, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.68-0.80]). Uninsured individuals with UIs were more likely to report not being fully recovered and no longer receiving treatment. At approximately 7 months after the health shock, uninsured individuals with NCCs still reported worse health status. Among individuals who experienced a health shock caused by an unintentional injury or a new chronic condition, uninsured individuals reported receiving less medical care and poorer short-term changes in health than those with insurance.
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        Equity in out-of-pocket payments for hospital care: evidence from India.

        The lack of formal health insurance and inadequate social safety nets cause families in most low-income countries to finance health spending through out-of-pocket (OOP) payments, leaving poor families unable to insure their consumption during periods of major illnesses. To examine how well the Indian healthcare system protects households of differing living standards against the financial consequences of unanticipated health shocks. The data are drawn from the 52nd round of National Sample Survey, a nationally representative socioeconomic and health survey conducted in 1995-1996. The sample comprises 24,379 (3.84%) households where a member was hospitalized during the 1-year reference period. We estimate, using ordinary least squares, the relationship between household consumption (proxy for ability to pay) and OOP payments for hospitalization. We also estimate the relationship between consumption and OOP share in consumption. Our results indicate that both utilization (payments) and the consequent financial burden (payment share) increases with increasing ability to pay (ATP). While this relationship is retained across the different subgroups (e.g., gender, social code, region, etc.), comparisons across groups indicate horizontal inequities including differences in both degrees of progressivity and the redistributive effect. The finding that OOP payments do not decline with ATP could be an indication of: (1) the lack of insurance which implies that the better-off must pay from OOP to secure quality health care and (2) the absence of risk-pooling or prepayments mechanisms which poses financial impediments to the consumption of health care by the poor.
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          Investigation of grip force, normal force, contact area, hand size, and handle size for cylindrical handles.

          To investigate relationships among grip forces, normal forces, contact area for cylindrical handles, handle diameter, hand size, and volar hand area.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Khulna University of Engineering & Technology, Khulna 9203, Bangladesh
            Author notes

            Academic Editor: Emiliano Schena

            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5149-1012
            Journal
            J Healthc Eng
            J Healthc Eng
            JHE
            Journal of Healthcare Engineering
            Hindawi
            2040-2295
            2040-2309
            2018
            25 February 2018
            : 2018
            5845494 10.1155/2018/4273616
            Copyright © 2018 M. S. Parvez and M. M. Shahriar.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Research Article

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