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      Acute and Chronic Effects of Noise Exposure on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate among Industrial Employees: The Cordis Study

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      Archives of Environmental Health: An International Journal

      Informa UK Limited

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          Abstract

          The effects of industrial noise on resting heart rate and blood pressure were studied in 3,105 blue-collar workers. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured in different workers at various times during the workday. After controlling for several possible confounders, we found that resting heart rate in females was associated positively with noise intensity (p = .036) and with time of day (p = .054). In males, resting heart rate was associated with noise intensity; however, such association was related to time of day (p = .046). No such associations were found for blood pressure in either sex. We plotted the mean resting heart rate by time of day for workers exposed to high [ > or = 80 db(A)] and low noise, and no difference was evident with respect to morning heart rate in either sex. After 4 h of noise exposure for males (and less time for females), individuals who were exposed to high noise had higher heart rates; however, in females this was not observed at the end of the workday. Thus, recurrent daily exposure to high noise at work has an acute, though not residual, effect on resting heart rate.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Reproducibility and circadian rhythm of heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

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            Health effects of traffic noise

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              Sensitivity to noise in a community sample: II. Measurement of psychophysiological indices.

              A sample of 77 women of high and low noise sensitivity in 1977, living in areas of high and low exposure to aircraft noise, were interviewed in the community in 1980. High, intermediate and low noise sensitive women were compared, using measures of blood pressure, heart rate, skin conductance, hearing threshold, uncomfortable loudness level and magnitude estimation of six tones. These physiological measures did not clearly distinguish different noise sensitivity groups, except that highly noise sensitive women had a consistently slower heart rate. Noise sensitivity was not related to auditory threshold. In the high aircraft noise area there were significantly more skin conductance responses than in the low aircraft noise area irrespective of noise sensitivity. This may be the result of chronic exposure to high aircraft noise.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Archives of Environmental Health: An International Journal
                Archives of Environmental Health: An International Journal
                Informa UK Limited
                0003-9896
                August 1995
                August 1995
                : 50
                : 4
                : 298-304
                Article
                10.1080/00039896.1995.9935958
                7677430
                © 1995

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