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      Interlayer gap widened α-phase molybdenum trioxide as high-rate anodes for dual-ion-intercalation energy storage devices

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          Abstract

          Employing high-rate ion-intercalation electrodes represents a feasible way to mitigate the inherent trade-off between energy density and power density for electrochemical energy storage devices, but efficient approaches to boost the charge-storage kinetics of electrodes are still needed. Here, we demonstrate a water-incorporation strategy to expand the interlayer gap of α-MoO 3, in which water molecules take the place of lattice oxygen of α-MoO 3. Accordingly, the modified α-MoO 3 electrode exhibits theoretical-value-close specific capacity (963 C g −1 at 0.1 mV s −1), greatly improved rate capability (from 4.4% to 40.2% at 100 mV s −1) and boosted cycling stability (from 21 to 71% over 600 cycles). A fast-kinetics dual-ion-intercalation energy storage device is further assembled by combining the modified α-MoO 3 anode with an anion-intercalation graphite cathode, operating well over a wide discharge rate range. Our study sheds light on a promising design strategy of layered materials for high-kinetics charge storage.

          Abstract

          The power/energy trade-off is a common feature seen in a Ragone plot for an electrochemical storage device. Here the authors approach this issue by showing water-incorporated α-MoO 3 anodes with expanded interlayer gaps, which allow for the assembling of dual-ion energy storage devices.

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          Most cited references 36

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          Ultrahigh-power micrometre-sized supercapacitors based on onion-like carbon.

          Electrochemical capacitors, also called supercapacitors, store energy in two closely spaced layers with opposing charges, and are used to power hybrid electric vehicles, portable electronic equipment and other devices. By offering fast charging and discharging rates, and the ability to sustain millions of cycles, electrochemical capacitors bridge the gap between batteries, which offer high energy densities but are slow, and conventional electrolytic capacitors, which are fast but have low energy densities. Here, we demonstrate microsupercapacitors with powers per volume that are comparable to electrolytic capacitors, capacitances that are four orders of magnitude higher, and energies per volume that are an order of magnitude higher. We also measured discharge rates of up to 200 V s(-1), which is three orders of magnitude higher than conventional supercapacitors. The microsupercapacitors are produced by the electrophoretic deposition of a several-micrometre-thick layer of nanostructured carbon onions with diameters of 6-7 nm. Integration of these nanoparticles in a microdevice with a high surface-to-volume ratio, without the use of organic binders and polymer separators, improves performance because of the ease with which ions can access the active material. Increasing the energy density and discharge rates of supercapacitors will enable them to compete with batteries and conventional electrolytic capacitors in a number of applications.
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            Materials science. Where do batteries end and supercapacitors begin?

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              An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

              The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                simon@chimie.ups-tlse.fr
                xinliang.feng@tu-dresden.de
                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-1723
                12 March 2020
                12 March 2020
                2020
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2111 7257, GRID grid.4488.0, Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) & Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, , Technische Universität Dresden, ; 01062 Dresden, Germany
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2353 1689, GRID grid.11417.32, CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, ; Toulouse, France
                [3 ]GRID grid.494528.6, Réseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l’Energie (RS2E), CNRS, ; 3459 Amiens, France
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2360 039X, GRID grid.12981.33, MOE of the Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, The Key Lab of Low-carbon Chem & Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry, , Sun Yat-sen University, ; 510275 Guangzhou, China
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2360 039X, GRID grid.12981.33, Instrumental Analysis and Research Centre, , Sun Yat-sen University, ; 510275 Guangzhou, China
                [6 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 7312, GRID grid.34421.30, Ames Laboratory-U. S. Department of Energy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, , Iowa State University, ; Ames, IA 50011 USA
                Article
                15216
                10.1038/s41467-020-15216-w
                7067814
                32165638
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100001665, Agence Nationale de la Recherche (French National Research Agency);
                Award ID: STORE-EX
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100010661, EC | Horizon 2020 Framework Programme (EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation H2020);
                Award ID: 819698
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100001659, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation);
                Award ID: MX-OSMOPED
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
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                © The Author(s) 2020

                Uncategorized

                materials science, batteries

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