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      Exploring the Interplay of Trait Self-Control and Ego Depletion: Empirical Evidence for Ironic Effects : Ironic effects of self-control

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      European Journal of Personality

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references 38

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          Working Memory Capacity as Executive Attention

           Randall Engle (2016)
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            Making choices impairs subsequent self-control: a limited-resource account of decision making, self-regulation, and active initiative.

            The current research tested the hypothesis that making many choices impairs subsequent self-control. Drawing from a limited-resource model of self-regulation and executive function, the authors hypothesized that decision making depletes the same resource used for self-control and active responding. In 4 laboratory studies, some participants made choices among consumer goods or college course options, whereas others thought about the same options without making choices. Making choices led to reduced self-control (i.e., less physical stamina, reduced persistence in the face of failure, more procrastination, and less quality and quantity of arithmetic calculations). A field study then found that reduced self-control was predicted by shoppers' self-reported degree of previous active decision making. Further studies suggested that choosing is more depleting than merely deliberating and forming preferences about options and more depleting than implementing choices made by someone else and that anticipating the choice task as enjoyable can reduce the depleting effect for the first choices but not for many choices. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved
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              Self-regulatory failure: a resource-depletion approach.

              Three studies were conducted to test the behavioral consequences of effortful self-regulation. Individuals with chronic inhibitions about eating were exposed to situations varying in level of self-regulatory demand. Subsequently, participants' ability to self-regulate was measured. Two studies manipulated self-regulatory demand by exposing participants to good-tasting snack foods, whereas a third study required participants to control their emotional expressions. As hypothesized, exerting self-control during the first task led to decrements in self-control on a subsequent task. Moreover, these effects were not due to changes in affective state and occurred only when self-control was required in the first task. These findings are explained in terms of depletion of self-regulatory resources, which impairs successful volitional control.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Journal of Personality
                Eur. J. Pers.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                08902070
                September 2014
                September 2014
                : 28
                : 5
                : 413-424
                Article
                10.1002/per.1899
                © 2014
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/per.1899

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