63
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    2
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 177

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A critical review of the durability of adhesion to tooth tissue: methods and results.

          The immediate bonding effectiveness of contemporary adhesives is quite favorable, regardless of the approach used. In the long term, the bonding effectiveness of some adhesives drops dramatically, whereas the bond strengths of other adhesives are more stable. This review examines the fundamental processes that cause the adhesion of biomaterials to enamel and dentin to degrade with time. Non-carious class V clinical trials remain the ultimate test method for the assessment of bonding effectiveness, but in addition to being high-cost, they are time- and labor-consuming, and they provide little information on the true cause of clinical failure. Therefore, several laboratory protocols were developed to predict bond durability. This paper critically appraises methodologies that focus on chemical degradation patterns of hydrolysis and elution of interface components, as well as mechanically oriented test set-ups, such as fatigue and fracture toughness measurements. A correlation of in vitro and in vivo data revealed that, currently, the most validated method to assess adhesion durability involves aging of micro-specimens of biomaterials bonded to either enamel or dentin. After about 3 months, all classes of adhesives exhibited mechanical and morphological evidence of degradation that resembles in vivo aging effects. A comparison of contemporary adhesives revealed that the three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives remain the 'gold standard' in terms of durability. Any kind of simplification in the clinical application procedure results in loss of bonding effectiveness. Only the two-step self-etch adhesives approach the gold standard and do have some additional clinical benefits.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Mechanisms and genes of cellular suicide.

             H Steller (1995)
            Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct form of programmed cell death that plays a major role during development, homeostasis, and in many diseases including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and neurodegenerative disorders. Apoptosis occurs through the activation of a cell-intrinsic suicide program. The basic machinery to carry out apoptosis appears to be present in essentially all mammalian cells at all times, but the activation of the suicide program is regulated by many different signals that originate from both the intracellular and the extracellular milieu. Genetic studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have led to the isolation of genes that are specifically required for the induction of programmed cell death. At least some components of the apoptotic program have been conserved among worms, insects, and vertebrates.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Buonocore memorial lecture. Adhesion to enamel and dentin: current status and future challenges.

              Bonding to tooth tissue can be achieved through an "etch&rinse," "self-etch" or "glass-ionomer" approach. In this paper, the basic bonding mechanism to enamel and dentin of these three approaches is demonstrated by means of ultramorphological and chemical characterization of tooth-biomaterial interfacial interactions. Furthermore, bond-strength testing and measurement of marginal-sealing effectiveness (the two most commonly employed methodologies to determine "bonding effectiveness" in the laboratory) are evaluated upon their value and relevance in predicting clinical performance. A new dynamic methodology to test biomaterial-tooth bonds in a fatigue mode is introduced with a recently developed micro-rotary fatigue-testing device. Eventually, today's adhesives will be critically weighted upon their performance in diverse laboratory studies and clinical trials. Special attention has been given to the benefits/drawbacks of an etch&rinse versus a self-etch approach and the long-term performance of these adhesives. Correlating data gathered in the laboratory with clinical results clearly showed that laboratory research CAN predict clinical effectiveness. Although there is a tendency to simplify bonding procedures, the data presented confirm that conventional three-step etch&rinse adhesives still perform most favorably and are most reliable in the long-term. Nevertheless, a self-etch approach may have the best future perspective. Clinically, when adhesives no longer require an "etch&rinse" step, the application time, and probably more importantly, the technique-sensitivity are substantially reduced. Especially "mild," two-step self-etch adhesives that bond through a combined micromechanical and chemical interaction with tooth tissue closely approach conventional three-step systems in bonding performance.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Mol Sci
                ijms
                International Journal of Molecular Sciences
                Molecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI)
                1422-0067
                September 2009
                4 September 2009
                : 10
                : 9
                : 3861-3899
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Fixed & Implant Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 541 24, Greece; E-Mails: athinabakopoulou@ 123456hotmail.com (B.A.); garefis@ 123456dent.auth.gr (G.P.)
                [2 ]Department of Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, 115 27, Greece
                Author notes
                [* ]Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: trpapad@ 123456dent.uoa.gr (P.T.); Tel. +302-107-461-100; Fax: +302-107-461-306.
                Article
                ijms-10-03861
                10.3390/ijms10093861
                2769064
                19865523
                © 2009 by the authors; licensee Molecular Diversity Preservation International, Basel, Switzerland.

                This article is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

                Categories
                Review

                Comments

                Comment on this article