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      Max: a helix-loop-helix zipper protein that forms a sequence-specific DNA-binding complex with Myc.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Amino Acid Sequence, Base Sequence, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors, Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors, Cloning, Molecular, DNA-Binding Proteins, genetics, metabolism, Escherichia coli, Gene Library, Genes, myc, Glutathione Transferase, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Oligonucleotide Probes, Protein Biosynthesis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic

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          Abstract

          The myc protooncogene family has been implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and neoplasia, but its mechanism of function at the molecular level is unknown. The carboxyl terminus of Myc family proteins contains a basic region helix-loop-helix leucine zipper motif (bHLH-Zip), which has DNA-binding activity and has been predicted to mediate protein-protein interactions. The bHLH-Zip region of c-Myc was used to screen a complementary DNA (cDNA) expression library, and a bHLH-Zip protein, termed Max, was identified. Max specifically associated with c-Myc, N-Myc, and L-Myc proteins, but not with a number of other bHLH, bZip, or bHLH-Zip proteins. The interaction between Max and c-Myc was dependent on the integrity of the c-Myc HLH-Zip domain, but not on the basic region or other sequences outside the domain. Furthermore, the Myc-Max complex bound to DNA in a sequence-specific manner under conditions where neither Max nor Myc exhibited appreciable binding. The DNA-binding activity of the complex was dependent on both the dimerization domain and the basic region of c-Myc. These results suggest that Myc family proteins undergo a restricted set of interactions in the cell and may belong to the more general class of eukaryotic DNA-binding transcription factors.

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          Journal
          2006410

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