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      You Know What It Is: Learning Words through Listening to Hip-Hop

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      PLoS ONE

      Public Library of Science

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          Abstract

          Music listeners have difficulty correctly understanding and remembering song lyrics. However, results from the present study support the hypothesis that young adults can learn African-American English (AAE) vocabulary from listening to hip-hop music. Non-African-American participants first gave free-response definitions to AAE vocabulary items, after which they answered demographic questions as well as questions addressing their social networks, their musical preferences, and their knowledge of popular culture. Results from the survey show a positive association between the number of hip-hop artists listened to and AAE comprehension vocabulary scores. Additionally, participants were more likely to know an AAE vocabulary item if the hip-hop artists they listen to use the word in their song lyrics. Together, these results suggest that young adults can acquire vocabulary through exposure to hip-hop music, a finding relevant for research on vocabulary acquisition, the construction of adolescent and adult identities, and the adoption of lexical innovations.

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          Most cited references 42

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          Vocabulary Development: A Morphological Analysis

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            The do re mi's of everyday life: the structure and personality correlates of music preferences.

            The present research examined individual differences in music preferences. A series of 6 studies investigated lay beliefs about music, the structure underlying music preferences, and the links between music preferences and personality. The data indicated that people consider music an important aspect of their lives and listening to music an activity they engaged in frequently. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, analyses of the music preferences of over 3,500 individuals converged to reveal 4 music-preference dimensions: Reflective and Complex, Intense and Rebellious, Upbeat and Conventional, and Energetic and Rhythmic. Preferences for these music dimensions were related to a wide array of personality dimensions (e.g., Openness), self-views (e.g., political orientation), and cognitive abilities (e.g., verbal IQ).
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              SEGREGATION AND STRATIFICATION: A Biosocial Perspective

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, USA )
                1932-6203
                2011
                21 December 2011
                : 6
                : 12
                Affiliations
                Department of Linguistics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
                Umeå University, Sweden
                Author notes

                Conceived and designed the experiments: PC. Performed the experiments: PC. Analyzed the data: PC. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: PC. Wrote the paper: PC.

                Article
                PONE-D-11-13207
                10.1371/journal.pone.0028248
                3244393
                22205942
                Paula Chesley. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
                Page count
                Pages: 10
                Categories
                Research Article
                Social and Behavioral Sciences
                Linguistics
                Natural Language
                Sociolinguistics
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Sociology
                Culture
                Social Networks

                Uncategorized

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