9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The dark face of fructose as a tumor promoter

      editorial
      Genes & Diseases
      Chongqing Medical University

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Fructose, an essential biomolecule and it is a major ingredient of the modern diet across the globe. Excess consumption of fructose may be a key driver of many serious diseases such as obesity, heart diseases, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Understanding the metabolism of fructose, molecular mechanisms of its toxic nature will aid in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

          Related collections

          Most cited references18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A genetic model for colorectal tumorigenesis.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Food consumption trends and drivers

            A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections to 2050, both globally and for different regions of the world, along with the drivers largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review. Throughout the world, major shifts in dietary patterns are occurring, even in the consumption of basic staples towards more diversified diets. Accompanying these changes in food consumption at a global and regional level have been considerable health consequences. Populations in those countries undergoing rapid transition are experiencing nutritional transition. The diverse nature of this transition may be the result of differences in socio-demographic factors and other consumer characteristics. Among other factors including urbanization and food industry marketing, the policies of trade liberalization over the past two decades have implications for health by virtue of being a factor in facilitating the ‘nutrition transition’ that is associated with rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Future food policies must consider both agricultural and health sectors, thereby enabling the development of coherent and sustainable policies that will ultimately benefit agriculture, human health and the environment.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis

              In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Genes Dis
                Genes Dis
                Genes & Diseases
                Chongqing Medical University
                2352-4820
                2352-3042
                16 October 2019
                June 2020
                16 October 2019
                : 7
                : 2
                : 163-165
                Affiliations
                [1]Department of Biochemistry, Center of Excellence in Molecular Biology & Regenerative Medicine, JSS Medical College, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysore, 570015, Karnataka, India
                Article
                S2352-3042(19)30087-X
                10.1016/j.gendis.2019.10.001
                7083712
                32215285
                953c0d67-1f51-4b37-afd1-927fc6576fc5
                © 2019 Chongqing Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                History
                : 29 August 2019
                : 1 October 2019
                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article