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      Current development of biodegradable polymeric materials for biomedical applications

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          Abstract

          In the last half-century, the development of biodegradable polymeric materials for biomedical applications has advanced significantly. Biodegradable polymeric materials are favored in the development of therapeutic devices, including temporary implants and three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering. Further advancements have occurred in the utilization of biodegradable polymeric materials for pharmacological applications such as delivery vehicles for controlled/sustained drug release. These applications require particular physicochemical, biological, and degradation properties of the materials to deliver effective therapy. As a result, a wide range of natural or synthetic polymers able to undergo hydrolytic or enzymatic degradation is being studied for biomedical applications. This review outlines the current development of biodegradable natural and synthetic polymeric materials for various biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, temporary implants, wound healing, and drug delivery.

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          Most cited references 225

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          Chitosan chemistry and pharmaceutical perspectives.

           A Domb,  H Sashiwa,  A. Kumar (2004)
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            Bone tissue engineering: state of the art and future trends.

            Although several major progresses have been introduced in the field of bone regenerative medicine during the years, current therapies, such as bone grafts, still have many limitations. Moreover, and in spite of the fact that material science technology has resulted in clear improvements in the field of bone substitution medicine, no adequate bone substitute has been developed and hence large bone defects/injuries still represent a major challenge for orthopaedic and reconstructive surgeons. It is in this context that TE has been emerging as a valid approach to the current therapies for bone regeneration/substitution. In contrast to classic biomaterial approach, TE is based on the understanding of tissue formation and regeneration, and aims to induce new functional tissues, rather than just to implant new spare parts. The present review pretends to give an exhaustive overview on all components needed for making bone tissue engineering a successful therapy. It begins by giving the reader a brief background on bone biology, followed by an exhaustive description of all the relevant components on bone TE, going from materials to scaffolds and from cells to tissue engineering strategies, that will lead to "engineered" bone. Scaffolds processed by using a methodology based on extrusion with blowing agents.
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              Biomedical applications of collagen.

              Collagen is regarded as one of the most useful biomaterials. The excellent biocompatibility and safety due to its biological characteristics, such as biodegradability and weak antigenecity, made collagen the primary resource in medical applications. The main applications of collagen as drug delivery systems are collagen shields in ophthalmology, sponges for burns/wounds, mini-pellets and tablets for protein delivery, gel formulation in combination with liposomes for sustained drug delivery, as controlling material for transdermal delivery, and nanoparticles for gene delivery and basic matrices for cell culture systems. It was also used for tissue engineering including skin replacement, bone substitutes, and artificial blood vessels and valves. This article reviews biomedical applications of collagen including the collagen film, which we have developed as a matrix system for evaluation of tissue calcification and for the embedding of a single cell suspension for tumorigenic study. The advantages and disadvantages of each system are also discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2018
                24 September 2018
                : 12
                : 3117-3145
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Growth and Development, Section of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA, zzheng@ 123456dentistry.ucla.edu
                [2 ]UCLA Department of Surgery and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and The Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA, bsoo@ 123456ucla.edu
                [3 ]UCLA Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Chia Soo, UCLA Department of Surgery and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and The Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California, 675 Charles E Young Drive, South MRL 2641, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1759, USA, Tel +1 310 794 5479, Fax +1 310 206 7783, Email bsoo@ 123456ucla.edu
                Zhong Zheng, Division of Growth and Development, Section of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of California, 675 Charles E Young Drive, South MRL 2641, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1759, USA, Tel +1 310 206 5646, Fax +1 310 206 7783, Email zzheng@ 123456dentistry.ucla.edu
                Article
                dddt-12-3117
                10.2147/DDDT.S165440
                6161720
                © 2018 Song et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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