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      Apocalypse Without Revelation?: Shakespeare, Salvagepunk and Station Eleven

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          Abstract

          This article argues that in Station Eleven, the apocalypse brought by the Georgia Flu does not lead to revelation. Organized around a close reading of a scene in which a character named Miranda explicitly links the economic collapses of 2007–8 and the collapse occasioned by the Flu, this article argues that the novel and its characters come close to acknowledging – as critics Frederick Buell and Evan Calder Williams do – that the pre-Flu world was already apocalyptic, but in failing to fully do so they seek to redeem and recuperate this world rather than build a newer, better one. The article is arranged into two sections. The first argues that the novel’s use of Shakespeare helps Mandel register the way the Georgia Flu brings the end of the Anthropocene, an era she also defines as the era of globalized trade. The second section continues this focus on the novel’s engagement with capitalism. Reading the novel through Evan Calder Williams’ concept of ‘salvagepunk’, it borrows Jerrold E. Hogle’s description of the gothic to show how Station Eleven simultaneously addresses and disguises what Williams calls ‘capitalist apocalypse’, and in the process comes tantalizingly close to – but ultimately refuses – revelation.

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          Defining the anthropocene.

          Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Here we review the historical genesis of the idea and assess anthropogenic signatures in the geological record against the formal requirements for the recognition of a new epoch. The evidence suggests that of the various proposed dates two do appear to conform to the criteria to mark the beginning of the Anthropocene: 1610 and 1964. The formal establishment of an Anthropocene Epoch would mark a fundamental change in the relationship between humans and the Earth system.
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            ‘Solastalgia’ A new concept in health and identity

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              Station Eleven offers suspense and science fiction, but it is undoubtedly a literary work

               C. Cameron,  C CAMERON (2014)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2056-6700
                Open Library of Humanities
                Open Library of Humanities
                2056-6700
                30 January 2018
                2018
                : 4
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
                Article
                10.16995/olh.235
                Copyright: © 2018 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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                Self URI (journal-page): https://olh.openlibhums.org/
                Categories
                Station eleven and twenty-first century writing

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