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      Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity

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      Trends in Cognitive Sciences

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The ability to resist the urge to eat requires the proper functioning of neuronal circuits involved in top-down control to oppose the conditioned responses that predict reward from eating the food and the desire to eat the food. Imaging studies show that obese subjects might have impairments in dopaminergic pathways that regulate neuronal systems associated with reward sensitivity, conditioning and control. It is known that the neuropeptides that regulate energy balance (homeostatic processes) through the hypothalamus also modulate the activity of dopamine cells and their projections into regions involved in the rewarding processes underlying food intake. It is postulated that this could also be a mechanism by which overeating and the resultant resistance to homoeostatic signals impairs the function of circuits involved in reward sensitivity, conditioning and cognitive control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Trends in Cognitive Sciences
          Trends in Cognitive Sciences
          Elsevier BV
          13646613
          January 2011
          January 2011
          : 15
          : 1
          : 37-46
          Article
          10.1016/j.tics.2010.11.001
          3124340
          21109477
          © 2011

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