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      Recent evidence on early mobilization in critical-Ill patients :

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          Efficacy and safety of very early mobilisation within 24 h of stroke onset (AVERT): a randomised controlled trial.

          Early mobilisation after stroke is thought to contribute to the effects of stroke-unit care; however, the intervention is poorly defined and not underpinned by strong evidence. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of frequent, higher dose, very early mobilisation with usual care after stroke.
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            Exercise rehabilitation for patients with critical illness: a randomized controlled trial with 12 months of follow-up

            Introduction The purpose of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of an exercise rehabilitation program commencing during ICU admission and continuing into the outpatient setting compared with usual care on physical function and health-related quality of life in ICU survivors. Methods We conducted a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and fifty participants were stratified and randomized to receive usual care or intervention if they were in the ICU for 5 days or more and had no permanent neurological insult. The intervention group received intensive exercises in the ICU and the ward and as outpatients. Participants were assessed at recruitment, ICU admission, hospital discharge and at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Physical function was evaluated using the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) (primary outcome), the Timed Up and Go Test and the Physical Function in ICU Test. Patient-reported outcomes were measured using the Short Form 36 Health Survey, version 2 (SF-36v2) and Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) Instrument. Data were analyzed using mixed models. Results The a priori enrollment goal was not reached. There were no between-group differences in demographic and hospital data, including acuity and length of acute hospital stay (LOS) (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score: 21 vs 19; hospital LOS: 20 vs 24 days). No significant differences were found for the primary outcome of 6MWT or any other outcomes at 12 months after ICU discharge. However, exploratory analyses showed the rate of change over time and mean between-group differences in 6MWT from first assessment were greater in the intervention group. Conclusions Further research examining the trajectory of improvement with rehabilitation is warranted in this population. Trial registration The trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12605000776606.
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              The ABCDEF Bundle: Science and Philosophy of How ICU Liberation Serves Patients and Families.

              E Ely (2017)
              Over the past 20 years, critical care has matured in a myriad of ways resulting in dramatically higher survival rates for our sickest patients. For millions of new survivors comes de novo suffering and disability called "the postintensive care syndrome." Patients with postintensive care syndrome are robbed of their normal cognitive, emotional, and physical capacity and cannot resume their previous life. The ICU Liberation Collaborative is a real-world quality improvement initiative being implemented across 76 ICUs designed to engage strategically the ABCDEF bundle through team- and evidence-based care. This article explains the science and philosophy of liberating ICU patients and families from harm that is both inherent to critical illness and iatrogenic. ICU liberation is an extensive program designed to facilitate the implementation of the pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines using the evidence-based ABCDEF bundle. Participating ICU teams adapt data from hundreds of peer-reviewed studies to operationalize a systematic and reliable methodology that shifts ICU culture from the harmful inertia of sedation and restraints to an animated ICU filled with patients who are awake, cognitively engaged, and mobile with family members engaged as partners with the ICU team at the bedside. In doing so, patients are "liberated" from iatrogenic aspects of care that threaten his or her sense of self-worth and human dignity. The goal of this 2017 plenary lecture at the 47th Society of Critical Care Medicine Congress is to provide clinical ICU teams a synthesis of the literature that led to the creation of ICU liberation philosophy and to explain how this patient- and family-centered, quality improvement program is novel, generalizable, and practice changing.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
                Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0952-7907
                2018
                January 2018
                : 1
                Article
                10.1097/ACO.0000000000000568
                29351145
                962c92d7-2098-4789-bea5-c8bf2527802f
                © 2018
                History

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